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Extension > Mark Seeley's WeatherTalk > February 2012

Friday, February 24, 2012

Increase in seasonal snowfall totals

Increase in seasonal snowfall totals

Monday through Wednesday this week brought several inches of new snow to areas of the state. In fact, it was the snowiest 3-day period of the winter for some observers. In the north International Falls reported 8 inches; Crookston, Orr, Hibbing, Cook, and Two Harbors reported 6 inches; Isabella reported 6.2 inches; and Kabetogama reported 7.4 inches. In central Minnesota Mora reported 5.2 inches and Plymouth 5.0 inches, while MSP reported 2.7 inches. In the south Theilman, and Cannon Falls reported over 2 inches.

The new seasonal snowfall totals for some observers: Gunflint Lake 36.6 inches; Isabella 49.4 inches; Kabetogama 48.3 inches; Orr 40 inches, and International Falls 41.2 inches. Despite the recent snowfall, many locations are still significant seasonal deficiencies: at Duluth the season has delivered just 22.9 inches (normal through the end of February is 65.6 inches); at MSP the seasonal snowfall total is 18 inches (normal through the end of February is 39.7 inches); and at Rochester the seasonal snowfall total is just 20.1 inches (normal through the end of February is 39.9 inches).

Southern counties in the state were getting more appreciable snowfall on Thursday (Luverne reported over 4 inches), and there is another chance for snow (and mixed precipitation) expected on Sunday, and again next Tuesday and Wednesday to close out the month of February. If all of this snow and rain materializes February may end up to be the first wetter than normal month statewide since last July. Yes, we have recorded six consecutive drier than normal months in Minnesota, and it is about time to bring that to a halt.

Watch for any new Leap Day precipitation records

Since Leap Day (Feb 29) only comes around every 4 years, the record amounts for precipitation that day at many Minnesota locations are rather modest (0.7 inches of snowfall in the Twin Cities for example). With a major winter storm in the forecast for next Tuesday and Wednesday it is possible that many new precipitation records will be set around the state on Wednesday. We'll see.

Weekly Weather Potpourri

Wednesday and Thursday brought a strong winter storm to Colorado and Wyoming this week. Heavy snow was driven by extreme wind, 70-90 mph in places. This resulted in power outages for some, broken trees, and closure of Interstate 70 and Interstate 25 for periods of time. It snowed up to 3 feet in Wyoming's Teton Mountains.

Long-lived Cyclone Giovanna brought heavy rainfall to Madagascar last week and early this week. NASA's TRMM satellite measurement systems estimated rainfall amounts of over 10 inches across Madagascar, causing serious flooding. News services reported at least 23 deaths due to the storm, and up to 190,000 people were displaced from their homes. Fortunately no threat of tropical storm development was seen in the Western Pacific or Indian Oceans this week.

According to recent research from the University of North Carolina at least 18 different bird species in the eastern USA are migrating north to their breeding grounds earlier in the year, most probably due to climate change. Researchers at UNC are using data collected through the eBird citizen observing program that has been operating the past decade. You can read more about this study here.

MPR listener questions


I go into the bathroom of my house on a windy day and the toilet water is moving around in the bowl. What causes this to happen?

Answer: The simple answer is pressure. House plumbing is vented to the outside through a vent stack (usually in the roof). On very windy days, the rapidly moving air across the top of the vent stack creates a suction, causing a fluctuating lowering of pressure in the vent stack. This in turn causes the water to move about in the waste water plumbing of the house. You can read more about this here.

With the relatively new NOAA Threaded Extremes in the Twin Cities climate record, what is the all-time high temperature and low temperature officially? How does this compare to say Rochester to the south and International Falls to the north?

For the Twin Cities (1871-2012), the highest temperature recorded is 108 F on July 14, 1936, the lowest ever is -41 F on January 21, 1888.
For Rochester (1886-2012), the highest temperature recorded is 108 F on July 14, 1936, the lowest ever is -42 F on January 7, 1887.
For International Falls (1897-2012), the highest temperature recorded is 103 F on July 22, 1923, the lowest ever is -55 F on January 6, 1909.
(Note: temperature records were not kept for International Falls in the 1930s).

Almanac for February 24th

The average MSP high temperature for this date is 30 degrees F (plus or minus 13 degrees F standard deviation), while the average low is 12 degrees F (plus or minus 14 degrees standard deviation).

MSP Local Records for February 24th

MSP weather records for this date include: highest daily maximum temperature of 59 degrees F in 1880; lowest daily maximum temperature of -2 degrees F in 1967; lowest daily minimum temperature of -20 degrees F in 1967; highest daily minimum temperature of 42 degrees F in 2000; record precipitation of 1.90 inches in 1930; record snowfall is a 4.8 inches in 2007.

Average dew point for February 24th is 16 degree F, with a maximum of 44 degrees F in 1930 and a minimum of -34 degrees F in 1950.

All-time state records for February 17th


Scanning the state climatic data base: the all-time high for this date is 67 degrees F at Pipestone (Pipestone County) in 1958. The all-time record low for this date is a very cold -46 degrees F at Red Lake Falls (Red Lake County) in 1955. The all-time record precipitation amount for this date is 2.10 inches at Beaver Bay (Lake County) in 1868 and at Tower (St Louis County) in 1964. State record snowfall for this date is 19.0 inches at Beaver Bay (Lake County) in 1868.

Past Weather Features:

February 21-24, 1868 brought a significant winter storm to Minnesota. Rain and snow mixed fell across the state. Fort Ripley received over a foot of snow, while Beaver Bay reported 19 inches. In the Twin Cities nearly 10 inches of snowfall was reported.

On February 24, 1880 a mild, spring-like day greeted Minnesota citizens. Residents of St Paul enjoyed 59 degrees F under sunny skies, while up north in Duluth the afternoon temperature reached a balmy 52 degrees F. Temperatures cooled down to single digits and below zero F readings by the end of the month that Leap Year of 1880.

A winter storm over February 22-25, 1964 brought heavy snowfall to northern Minnesota. Waskish received 7 inches, Leech Lake 8 inches, and Big Falls reported 8.5 inches from the storm. For some Minnesota weather observers this was the only significant snow storm of the month.

Both February 24, 1955 and 1967 saw extreme cold visit the state. Many observers reported overnight lows of -30 degrees F or colder, and even -40 F and colder in northern counties. Daytime highs could not rise above 0 F. Many observers reported daytime highs between -5 and -8 degrees F.
The last exceptionally snowy February 24 was in 2001, when many observers reported from 4 to 12 inches of new snowfall. Minnesota, Cloquet, Two Harbors, Duluth, Moose Lake, and Hinckley all reported 10-12 inches of new snow.

Outlook

Mostly sunny and mild on Saturday. Increasing cloudiness on Sunday, with a chance for rain or snow. Snow will be heavier in the north. Continued chance for precipitation through Monday. Then another chance for rain/snow late Tuesday and into Wednesday next week, with more significant amounts in southern Minnesota. Temperatures will fall back closer to seasonal normals to conclude the month of February.

Friday, February 17, 2012

Snow this week

Snow this week

Monday, February 13th brought snow to southern Minnesota counties, as well as a few communities in the north. Across the south 1-4 inches of snowfall blanketed what had been a snow-free landscape. Grand Meadow reported 3 inches, while Caledonia in Houston County reported 4 inches, their heaviest snowfall of the 2011-2012 season. Brainerd and Moorhead reported over 3 inches, while Hibbing reported 5 inches. More snow came on Wednesday to some southern counties as Sherburn, Wells, Fairmont, and Grand Meadow all reported 3 more inches.

 

Cold up north

From Friday, February 10th through Monday, February 13th northern Minnesota reported the coldest temperatures in the 48 contiguous states, the first time this winter such a streak of cold weather has dominated the northern Minnesota landscape. On February 10th it was -18 degrees F at Flag Island, on February 11th it was -20 degrees F at Fosston, on February 12th it was -14 degrees F at Embarrass, and on February 13th it was -16 degrees F at Embarrass. The cold spell came to an end by Valentine's Day as daytime temperatures soared into the 30s and 40s F again, well above normal for this time of year. In fact Marshall (Lyon County) reached 48 degrees F at 3:00 pm on Valentine's Day.

Last Call for Course on Minnesota's Severe Storms

My College of Continuing Education Class on Minnesota's severe weather history will begin on February 21st at 7:00 pm on the St Paul Campus. Only three sessions long (classes on February 28, and March 6 as well), I will dissect some of the state's most famous storms and discuss their consequences. We will also have a tour of the National Weather Service in Chanhassen during the last course meeting.

Weekly Weather Potpourri

Madagascar was hit by Cyclone Giovanni this week. The storm brought wind gust of 140 mph, heavy rains and strong coastal storm surge. It was expected to rejuvenate over the Mozambique Channel and perhaps bring heavy rain again to southern parts of Madagascar before dissipating.

Winter's grip has eased up in Europe this week. Last week's extreme cold was evident in single digit lows reported from the United Kingdom, and minimum temperatures as cold as -40 degrees F from eastern European countries. Cold and ice even caused parts of the Rome Colosseum to fall off, disrupting the tourism there. This week temperatures have climbed into the teens and twenties, even 40s and 50s F in parts of Germany and France, with less snow and more glimpses of the sun.

A recent paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences suggests that ecosystem response to heat waves and droughts is highly variable depending on the month and season in which they occur, and that this is an important feature of climate change that needs more study. For example prairie grasses respond far differently to drought in June than they do in September. You can read more about this study here.

MPR listener questions

I recently realized that there has been literally no static electricity this winter, at least for me. Did something in me change, or is it a result of this warm winter?

Answer: You are right about the warmth. Since November 1, 2011, 77 percent of all days have brought above normal temperatures to the Twin Cities. But in addition dewpoints (atmospheric water vapor) has been very high this winter. The presence of more moisture in the atmosphere makes it more conductive preventing the build-up of charged particles. In the indoor environment humidifiers help keep static electricity potential down, but Mother Nature does it best if the atmosphere outside is moist to begin with. During this winter we have had many dewpoints in the 20s and 30s F, about 25-30 degrees F higher than normal. These have produced days with relative humidity of 65-80 percent, conditions that are not conducive to the formation of static electricity.

Is the snow drought this winter strictly a lack of storms, or is it weak storm systems that deposit little snow?

Answer: To a degree it is both. For the Twin Cities (15.3 inches of snow to date) and Duluth (17.9 inches of snow to date), snow storms have been generally light in quantity, but also less frequent than in normal winters. In the Twin Cities the average number of daily snowfalls for the November through February period is 29, and only 20 days have delivered a measurable snowfall this winter. Up at Duluth, the average number of daily snowfalls for November through February is 45 and only 26 days have delivered a measurable snowfall this winter. In contrast, International Falls averages 44 days with measurable snowfall between November and February, and they have reported 46 days with measurable snowfall so far this winter, but all the storms have brought light amounts. The heaviest daily snowfall at International Falls has been only 4.5 inches back on November 26, 2011.

Almanac for February 17th

The average MSP high temperature for this date is 28 degrees F (plus or minus 13 degrees F standard deviation), while the average low is 10 degrees F (plus or minus 14 degrees standard deviation).

MSP Local Records for February 17th

MSP weather records for this date include: highest daily maximum temperature of 55 degrees F in 1981; lowest daily maximum temperature of -12 degrees F in 1936; lowest daily minimum temperature of -20 degrees F in 1903 and 1936; highest daily minimum temperature of 36 degrees F in 1998; record precipitation of 0.29 inches in 1972; record snowfall is a 3.8 inches in 1972.

Average dew point for February 17th is 14 degree F, with a maximum of 44 degrees F in 1981 and a minimum of -26 degrees F in 1942.

All-time state records for February 17th

Scanning the state climatic data base: the all-time high for this date is 66 degrees F at Luverne (Rock County) and at Pipestone (Pipestone County) in 1981. The all-time record low for this date is a very cold -52 degrees F at Pokegama Dam (Itasca County) in 1903. The all-time record precipitation amount for this date is 1.85 inches at Hokah (Houston County) in 1984. State record snowfall for this date is 13.0 inches at Beaver Bay (Lake County) in 1870.

Past Weather Features:

February 17, 1875 was the last of 16 consecutive days in the Twin Cities with below 0 F morning temperatures. Twenty-three days brought below 0 F temperature readings that month, the coldest February in Twin Cities history. A similar pattern prevailed at Duluth. At Fort Ripley they reported 44 consecutive days with below 0 F readings in the morning hours.

February 17, 1903 brought one of the coldest days in the history of Detroit Lakes, MN. After a morning low of -47 degrees F, the afternoon high only climbed to -26 degrees F.

February of 1936 was the coldest in state history. No wonder that many observers reported record low temperatures on the morning of February 17th. Over 20 communities were -30 degrees F or colder. Many observers reported 350 consecutive hours or more of below 0 F readings that month.
February 16-18, 1967 brought 6 to 14 inches of snowfall across southern and central Minnesota counties. Roads were closed in some places and schools were let out early for the weekend. It was one of the snowiest weeks of the winter in 1966-1967.

On February 17, 1981 spring was in the air. As far north as Detroit Lakes it was 57 degrees F, with many other western and southern Minnesota communities reporting afternoon temperatures in the 60s F under bright, sunny skies. From the 17th to the 21st of the month temperatures averaged 25-30 degrees F warmer than normal, thawing agricultural soils and promoting an early planting season.

Outlook

Mostly sunny to start the weekend, with above normal temperatures. Warmer yet on Sunday, but with increasing cloudiness later in the day. A chance for snow and rain, or mixed precipitation on Monday and continuing into Tuesday. Continued above normal temperatures with a chance for rain or snow showers on Wednesday and Thursday as well.

Friday, February 10, 2012

Cold revisits Minnesota

Cold revisits Minnesota

After starting February exceptionally warm last week, temperatures plummeted this week to more typical wintertime values. On Tuesday, February 7th Ash Lake in northern St Louis County reported the coldest temperature in the 48 contiguous states with -20 degrees F. Then on Wednesday, February 8th, Embarrass reported -17 degrees F, and after a brief respite from the cold on Thursday, Friday morning , February 10th Flag Island reported the coldest temperature among the 48 contiguous states with a reading of -17 degrees F. On February 7th over 20 Minnesota weather observers reported below 0 F readings, while on February 8th, the number of observers reporting below 0 F readings was over 30. Then, on Friday, February 10th over 50 Minnesota communities reported below 0 F readings, as far south as Windom (Cottonwood County) which reached -2 degrees F. An Extreme Cold Warning was in effect for northwestern counties on Friday, where windchill values were as cold as -40 degrees F. Another round of below 0 F readings are expected for Saturday morning, before a warming trend starts on Sunday.

Planting in February?

Historical records show that February of 1878 was so mild that many Minnesota farmers were in their fields planting small grains (wheat, barely, oats). Soils had thawed and were not too wet to till. Many observers reported temperatures in the 40s and 50s F for half the days of the month. It is the only time in Minnesota history, that much of the state was planted in the month of February.

Weekly Weather Potpourri

Tropical Cyclone Jasmine was churning in the South Pacific Ocean well east of Australia. It was an intense system with winds over 130 mph, generating sea wave heights over 30 ft. It is expected to dissipate out to sea southwest of Tonga over the weekend. Another Tropical Cyclone, Giovanna, was approaching Madagascar in the Southern Indian Ocean with wind speeds over 100 mph and sea waves over 15 feet. It was expected to bring heavy rains and strong winds to Madagascar over the weekend.

NOAA reported this week that January 2012 was the 4th warmest on record for the 48 contiguous states. It was also exceptional for the lack of snow cover across the USA, especially when compared to last year. You can read more here.

A big winter freeze continues to plague most of Europe as some eastern countries have seen temperatures plummet to -40 degrees F this week. News services report over 200 deaths due to exposure during this siege of arctic air. Many rivers and canals froze, including the Danube River, disrupting shipping traffic there. Freezing rain was making driving treacherous in parts of the United Kingdom as well. You can read more at the following links:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/weather/features/16948525

It was on February 9, 1870 that the U.S. National Weather Service was established. At first it was called the Weather Bureau and it was part of the War Department because, it was said, "military discipline would probably secure the greatest promptness, regularity, and accuracy in the required observations." It became a civilian agency 20 years later, under the Department of Agriculture, and then was switched to the Commerce Department in 1940. These days, the National Weather Service is based out of Silver Spring, Maryland. It plays a very big role in making sure that American air travel is safe, providing up-to-minute weather updates to air traffic controller centers across the nation.

MPR listener question

I have heard that some areas of the state are experiencing the lowest seasonal snowfall totals in many years. Will any records be set for lack of snow?

Answer: Indeed, many are reporting very low snowfall totals this winter. Some of these locations include:

MSP 14.9 inches (2nd lowest total behind 1930-1931 when 14.2 inches fell)
Austin 13.2 inches (lowest since winter of 1976-1977)
Zumbrota 12.8 inches (lowest since winter of 1962-1963)
St Cloud 16.2 inches (lowest since 1967-1968)

Those who might set new records for lowest ever snowfall seasons include:
Warroad, currently only 8.6 inches
Leech Lake, currently only 11.2 inches
Floodwood, currently only 11.4 inches
Moorhead, currently only 11.8 inches
Duluth Airport, currently only 17.4 inches

Almanac for February 10th

The average MSP high temperature for this date is 24 degrees F (plus or minus 12 degrees F standard deviation), while the average low is 6 degrees F (plus or minus 13 degrees standard deviation).

MSP Local Records for February 10th

MSP weather records for this date include: highest daily maximum temperature of 49 degrees F in 1877; lowest daily maximum temperature of -16 degrees F in 1899; lowest daily minimum temperature of -24 degrees F in 1885; highest daily minimum temperature of 33 degrees F in 1999; record precipitation of 0.60 inches in 1898; record snowfall is a 4.3 inches in 1953.

Average dew point for February 10th is 9 degree F, with a maximum of 37 degrees F in 1996 and a minimum of -25 degrees F in 1982.

All-time state records for February 10th

Scanning the state climatic data base: the all-time high for this date is 57 degrees F at Luverne (Rock County) in 1977. The all-time record low for this date is a very cold -49 degrees F at Tower (St Louis County) in 1899. The all-time record precipitation amount for this date is 1.69 inches at Montevideo (Chippewa County) in 1965. State record snowfall for this date is 20.0 inches at Pigeon River (Cook County) in 1939.

Past Weather Features:

February of 1877 brought one of the warmest ever stretches of winter weather to Minnesota. Ten of the first eleven days of the month brought daytime highs in the 40s F in St Paul, peaking with 49 degrees F on the 10th.

February 10, 1885 brought an arctic air mass to Minnesota with lows of -24 degrees F in St Paul, -27 degrees F in Moorhead, and -32 degrees F at Duluth. Temperatures remained below the freezing mark until the 25th.

Perhaps the coldest ever February 10th occurred in 1899 when many communities reported record-setting lows, including -49 F at Tower, -45 F at Pokegama Dam, -44 F at Leech Lake and Detroit Lakes, -42 F at Roseau and Willow River, -40 degrees F at Milaca, -39 F at Lake City, and -35 F at Caledonia. Temperatures turned around and reached the 40s F by the 15th of the month.

In the decidedly wet February of 1953 a winter storm deposited ice, glaze, and 6-8 inches of new snowfall across central Minnesota over the 9th and 10th. Beardsley reported 15 inches of snowfall. The ice and glaze caused numerous traffic accidents and delays, while also leading to some fallen power lines in western counties.

Another big snow storm occurred over February 9-10, 1965. Many central and northern Minnesota locations reported from 9 to 15 inches of new snow.

February 10-12 brought record warmth to many areas of Minnesota. Daytime temperatures reached the 40s and 50s F under bright, sunny skies.

Outlook

Cold to start the weekend with many single digit and below 0 F readings Saturday morning. Then a warming trend starts again on Sunday, with a chance for snow on Monday and Tuesday. Generally mild temperatures prevail again next week.

Friday, February 3, 2012

February starts warm and foggy

February starts warm and foggy

Following the trend of previous months, February started very warm this week with temperatures ranging from 15 to 25 degrees F warmer than average. Some observers in western Minnesota reported new record highs for February 1st including: 50 F at Morris; 51 F at Benson; 52 F at Ortonville and St James; 55 F at Marshall; and 56 F at Minnesota. On February 2nd afternoon temperatures again reached the 40s and 50s F in some places, as Rochester reported a new record high of 48 degrees F. It was the warmest first two days of February since 1931.

In addition, along river valleys and in eastern and northern sections of the state fog was dense and very persistent the first three days of the month. Almost continuous fog was reported from some southern counties, along with some freezing fog. In the north, fog, overcast, and occasional snow flurries prevailed over the first three days of the month.

High Dew points Too

With the warm temperatures, melting snow, and fog prevailing this week near record to record-setting dewpoint values were seen at a number of locations. Dew points ranged from 35-40 degrees F during the day, more typical of April and May. The condensation produced by high dewpoints made many surfaces wet and slippery, which combined with the fog contributed to hundreds of traffic accidents around the state.

Weekly Weather Potpourri

The NOAA-National Weather Service in Alaska reports one of the coldest Januarys in history there. Nome and Bettles, Alaska reported their coldest mean January temperature in history, while Fairbanks was 5th coldest. During the month some observers reported temperatures in the -60s to -70s F. Noatak, Alaska was still reporting -60 degrees F on February 2nd. You can read more here.

Heavy snows with blizzard conditions were reported from parts of Colorado this week. The National Weather Service reported snowfall rates as much as 2 inches per hour. Portions of Interstates 70 and 25 were closed to traffic for a time, and a weather observer west of Denver (near Pinecliff) reported 18 inches of new snow by Friday morning.

Heavy rains continue to fall over southern Madagascar which has seen little relief in two weeks. Following heavy rain from Cyclone Funso last week, tropical thunderstorms have continued much of this week. The rains washed out river banks, flooding hundreds of homes and displacing over 1000 people. More on Cyclone Funso can be found here.

Last week NASA renamed one of its polar orbiting satellites in honor of the late Professor Verner E. Suomi of the University of Wisconsin. Born in Eveleth, MN in 1915, Dr. Suomi is called the "father of satellite meteorology" having developed many of the instruments and tools used today during his tenure on the faculty of the Space Science and Engineering Center at UW-Madison, especially in the 1960s and 1970s. 

MPR listener question


Which Minnesota locations got the most snow in January, and where has the most seasonal snowfall occurred in the state so far?

Answer: Northern observers have reported the most snow. In January, Orr and Kabetogama reported over 16 inches, while Isabella in the highlands of the Lake Superior north shore reported 17 inches. For the entire snow season so far Isabella has reported 42 inches, Kabetogama nearly 38 inches, and Gunflint Lake and International Falls just over 32 inches.

Almanac for February 3rd

The average MSP high temperature for this date is 21 degrees F (plus or minus 15 degrees F standard deviation), while the average low is 4 degrees F (plus or minus 15 degrees standard deviation).

MSP Local Records for February 3rd

MSP weather records for this date include: highest daily maximum temperature of 51 degrees F in 1934; lowest daily maximum temperature of -13 degrees F in 1989; lowest daily minimum temperature of -27 degrees F in 1886; highest daily minimum temperature of 35 degrees F in 1991; record precipitation of 0.42 inches in 1943; record snowfall is a 3.4 inches in 1936 and 1976.

Average dew point for February 3rd is 3 degree F, with a maximum of 32 degrees F in 1924 and a minimum of -37 degrees F in 1923.

All-time state records for February 3rd

Scanning the state climatic data base: the all-time high for this date is 65 degrees F at Browns Valley (Traverse County) in 1991. The all-time record low for this date is a very cold -52 degrees F at Itasca State Park (Clearwater County) in 1996 and at Warroad (Roseau County) in 1936. The all-time record precipitation amount for this date is 1.50 inches at Red Lake in 2000. State record snowfall for this date is 12.0 inches at Caledonia, Harmony, La Crescent, and Zumbro Falls in 1983.

Past Weather Features:

During the first few days of February 1886 many observers reported morning lows of -30 degrees F or colder. Duluth reported a very snowy February, as half of the days in the month brought snowfall totally over 20 inches.

February of 1934 was one of the warmest and driest in state history. Many observers reported daytime highs in the 40s on the 3rd, and some reported temperatures in the 40s and 50s F for the remainder of the month. Places like Milan, Alexandria, Waseca, Morris, Winnebago, and Tracy saw their driest February of all time with just a trace of precipitation for the month.

On February 3, 1936 the state was in the grip of an extended arctic cold wave. Many communities reported low temperatures of -40 degrees F older. At Roseau the morning low was -48 degrees F and the afternoon high only made it to -8 degrees F. The Roseau observer did not report a temperature above zero F until February 8th.

Early February of 1983 brought significant snowfall to many southern and central communities. Over February 2-3 observers reported 6 to 12 inches of snowfall, which caused school delays and closed some roads. Caledonia ended up getting over 23 inches of snowfall that month.

1991 brought one of the warmest Februarys in state history. Over the first ten days, temperatures averaged 20-30 degrees above average at many Minnesota locations. Many days brought 40s, 50s, and even 60 degrees F.

On February 3, 1996 Tower, MN saw the thermometer rise 41 degrees F, from a low of -60 degrees F to a high of -19 degrees F. By February 8th the daytime high was 48 degrees F, a rise of 108 degrees.

Outlook

Weekend will start out cloudy and mild, but progressively get sunnier. Temperatures will remain mild, with a good deal of sun on Sunday. Cooler by Tuesday next week with temperatures falling back closer to normal. Chance of snow towards the end of next week, but generally dry across the state until then.
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