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Showing posts from September, 2013

Preliminary Climate Summary for September

Preliminary Climate Summary for September Average September temperatures reported by observers around the state ranged from 2 to 5 degrees F above normal. Several days early in the month hit 90 degrees F or higher, with high dewpoints (70 F) pushing the Heat Index Values between 98 F and 102 F on September 9th. The highest temperature for the month was 97 degrees F at Preston on the 7th, while the lowest was 26 degrees F at Embarrass on the 17th and at Brimson on the 22nd. Numerous frosts occurred in northeastern and north-central counties, while the rest of the state escaped a September frost, which was good for crop maturation and drying. Corn harvesting had begun in some areas of the state.

Precipitation for September was below normal for most observers, especially the northwestern and southern counties which reported just 5 or less days with rainfall. Most observers reported between 1 and 2 inches. Some of the driest spots in the state were Argyle (Marshall Co…

NOAA-Climate Prediction Center seasonal climate outlook

The NOAA-Climate Prediction Center released the new seasonal climate outlook on Thursday (Sept 19) this week The new climate outlooks released by NOAA-CPC on Thursday (Sept 19) favor a warmer than normal October across all of the Great Lakes Region, including Minnesota. Then the balance of the autumn and early winter shows equal chances for warm or colder than normal conditions to prevail. Though the precipitation outlook does not favor below normal values of precipitation during the balance of autumn the CPC drought outlook shows that many parts of Minnesota are expected to remain in drought through the month of December. You can see the various climate outlooks at the CPC web site.

 Cool up north Since last Saturday (September 4) many northern observers have reported multiple frosts and the lowest temperatures since the middle of last May. Some lows reported this week included:
31 degrees F at Grand Rapids and Little Fork
30 degrees F at Roseau, Leech Lake, Kabetogama…

Continued warm and dry pattern

Continued warm and dry pattern Despite the recent cool down temperatures so far this month are averaging from 3 to 6 degrees warmer than normal in most places. A brief respite occurred on Thursday and Friday this week (Sept 12-13) as a cool, dry Canadian air mass brought many overnight lows in the 30s F with much lower dewpoints. Perhaps we have seen the last of the 90 F temperatures, though it looks like next week daytime highs in the 80s F could return briefly with higher dewpoints and chances for thunderstorms.

Most of the state has seen drier than normal weather continue to prevail this month, especially in southern counties where rainfall totals are mostly less than a quarter of an inch. A few scattered spots in the north report above normal rainfall thanks to heavy, but widely scattered thunderstorms, including 3.64 inches at Fergus Falls, 3.08 inches at Long Prairie, 3.00 inches at Kabetogama, 2.83 inches at Ottertail, 2.32 inches at Grand Portage, and 2.30 inc…

September starts cool and dry

September starts cool and dry The first five days of September have started drier than normal (just as July and August did), while temperatures have been averaging 1 to 3 degrees F cooler than normal in most places. Many observers have already reported morning lows in the 30s including just 33 degrees F at Embarrass, and 34 degrees F at Bigfork, Crane Lake, and Chisholm. Temperatures as cold as 39 degrees F were reported as far south as Byron and Grand Meadow in southeastern Minnesota. Marshall, MN reported the state high of 92 degrees F on the 1st, while a few locations also reported some spotty rainfall on that date.

Rainfall deficits continue to mount in many parts of the state. The U.S. Drought Monitor now shows that over 53 percent of the state landscape is in moderate to severe drought. Severe drought is now designated for parts of Stearns, Sherburne, Benton, Wright, Meeker, and Kandiyohi Counties in central Minnesota. These counties and others had been droug…