University of Minnesota Extension
www.extension.umn.edu
612-624-1222
Menu Menu

Extension > Mark Seeley's WeatherTalk > August 2017

Thursday, August 31, 2017

August Climate Summary

August Climate Summary:


Mean August temperature values from around the state were generally 2 to 4 degrees F cooler than normal. Only the second cooler than normal month in 2017 (May was the other). Extreme temperatures for the month ranged from 93 degrees F at Granite Falls (Yellow Medicine County) on August 1st, and just 30 degrees F at Embarrass, Brimson, and Crane Lake on the 25th. Some observers in St Louis, Lake, Cook, and Koochiching Counties reported frosts during the month. Minnesota did not report the nation's lowest on any date this month.

The most noteworthy climate attribute of August was the rainfall. Overall the statewide average rainfall was over 5 inches, ranking as the 11th wettest month of August in state history. Some western and southern communities reported their wettest August in history with total rainfall values over 10 inches. Redwood Falls topped the state network reports with over 13 inches. They reported the largest ever 1-day rainfall on August 17th in state history with a measurement of 8.12 inches. In addition over 40 climate stations in the state reported at least one new daily rainfall record during the month.

Destruction from Harvey may be the weather story of the year:


Large and slow-moving Hurricane Harvey (later Tropical Storm Harvey) brought widespread flooding and devastation to many parts of southeastern Texas last weekend and earlier this week, most especially the Houston Metropolitan Area. Many communities in Jefferson, Galveston, and Harris Counties reported over 40 inches of rain from this storm, topped by 51.88 inches in the Cedar Bayou-Mont Belvieu area of the Eastern Metro Area, a value that is the largest amount of rainfall ever measured from a Tropical Storm. Flooding issues were compounded in Beaumont, TX (pop 120,000) when there water supply pumps failed, preventing access to fresh water for all the residents there. More recently over Wednesday-Thursday Harvey brought 10 to 20 inches of rainfall to portions of western and southern Louisiana. Over the coming Labor Day weekend remnants of Harvey as a low pressure system will move northeast, not affecting Minnesota but ending up on the North Atlantic Ocean. Further coverage on Harvey can be found at the Weather Underground web site.

State Fair Weather Quiz:


The Annual Minnesota State Fair continues through Labor Day (September 4th). We had a good time on August 29th broadcasting the Annual Minnesota Weather Quiz from the MPR Booth (corner of Judson and Nelson on the fairgrounds). For those who would like to take the quiz (so far nearly 600 people have taken it), it is still available online at the MPR web site.


Weekly Weather Potpourri:


This week, the United Kingdom Met Office provided a brief climate summary of the summer season (June-August) noting that it has been very wet and warmer than usual in 2017. For Scotland it has been their 5th wettest summer historically.

Also this week NOAA's Jake Crouch presents an analysis of the climate patterns across the USA so far this year. He makes some interesting observations about severe weather and the pattern of warm and dry years versus the pattern of wet and cool years. You can read more at NOAA web site.

Following all of the attention on Hurricane and Tropical Storm Harvey this week, the NOAA National Hurricane Center is tracking Hurricane Irma in the Eastern Atlantic Ocean. It is expected to strengthen to a Category 4 hurricane as it travels westward across the Atlantic Ocean towards Puerto Rico next week. This system will be closely monitored all of next week. Elsewhere in the Eastern Pacific Ocean, Tropical Storm Lidia was being monitored a may bring heavy rains and wind to portions of Mexico and Baja California over the weekend, while in the Western Pacific Ocean, Typhoon Sanvu was growing stronger and may bring rain and high seas to portions of Japan over the weekend.

With the school year starting, many science teachers are looking for engaging materials to use with their students. NOAA's Data in the Classroom Program provides some great real-time data for students to better understand atmospheric and ocean sciences. There are curricula materials on El Nino and Sea Level variations, Coral Bleaching, Ocean Acidification, and Water Quality.

A recent paper appearing in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences documents how climate change will alter the seasonality and geographic distribution of peak electricity loads across Europe. Southern portions of Europe will eventually use more electricity than northern Europe, and summer peak loads will be higher than those of winter. This is an interesting result of the disparity in climate change impacts across the European nations.

MPR listener question:

You mentioned during the State Fair broadcast of the Minnesota Weather Quiz this week that "rain begets rain" and that "drought begets drought." That sparked a conversation in our family that produced these two questions: What is the longest streak of consecutive days with measurable rainfall in the Twin Cities? Also, what is the longest streak of days with no precipitation in the Twin Cities?

Answer:

The longest stretch of consecutive days with measurable rain is from a long time ago, May 30, 1883 to June 9, 1883, 11 days. It rained at least .03 inches each day, with an 11 day total of 3.95 inches in the Twin Cities. No flooding was reported, but a lightning storm took out the telegraph lines across southern Minnesota during this interval. The most recent exceptionally long streak of consecutive days with precipitation was April 5 to April 14, 2013 (10 days) when a mixture of rain and/or snow occurred each day, totaling 6.8 inches of snow and 2.73 inches of precipitation.

The longest stretch of days when no measurable precipitation occurred was from November 15, 1943 to January 4, 1944, a period of 51 days. There were some dates in this interval when a trace of precipitation was reported. The most recent long spell of dry weather was September 26 to October 22, 2010, a period of 27 days.

Twin Cities Almanac for September 1st:


The average MSP high temperature for this date is 77 degrees F (plus or minus 9 degrees F standard deviation), while the average low is 59 degrees F (plus or minus 8 degrees F standard deviation).

MSP Local Records for September 1st:

MSP records for this date include: highest daily maximum temperature of 97 degrees F in 1913; lowest daily maximum temperature of 59 degrees F in 1951; lowest daily minimum temperature of 36 degrees F in 1974; highest daily minimum temperature of 74 degrees F in 1937 and 1953; record precipitation of 3.29 inches in 1942. No snowfall has occurred on this date.

Average dew point for September 1st is 56F; the maximum dew point on this date is 75F in 1997; and the minimum dew point on this date is 30F in 1946.

All-time state records for September 1st:

The all-time state high temperature for today's date is 101 degrees F at Beardsley (Big Stone County) in 1913; the all-time state low for today's date is 23 degrees F at Tower (St Louis County) in 1974. The all-time state record precipitation for this date is 7.70 inches at Nett Lake (St Louis County) in 1973. No snow has fallen on this date.

Past Weather Features:


The warmest ever September 1st came in 1913 when most areas of the state saw afternoon temperatures climb into the 90s F. Five locations surpassed 100 degrees F. St Peter started the day with a cool morning of 52 degrees F, but under sunny skies warmed up to 98 degrees F by 4pm.

Very strong thunderstorms moved across the state over August 31 and September 1, 1973 bringing very heavy rains and flash flooding to portions of northern. Rainfall totals from 4 to 8 inches occurred in portions of Clay, Mahnomen, Polk, and St Louis Counties. An unusual tornado passed between Big Falls and Little Fork in Koochiching Counties, destroying many farm buildings and some mobile homes.

By far the coldest September 1st in state history was in 1974. Many parts of the state saw widespread frosts. Over 40 climate stations reported freezing temperatures in the morning, representing 23 of Minnesota's 87 counties. Frost damage to crops, both corn and soybeans, was widespread as well.

Outlook:


Mostly sunny weekend with near normal temperatures. Chance of showers later in the day in the north on Labor Day. Cooler temperatures and chance for showers on Tuesday, and continuing cooler than normal temperatures for much of next week.

Friday, August 25, 2017

Record-setting wet August for some, first frosts in the north

Record-setting wet August for some:


Over 40 climate observers across the state report over 6.5 inches of rainfall for this month, roughly twice the normal amount. With a week to go these numbers will certainly increase. For some locations it has already been a record-setting wet month. This is true for the following locations:
Redwood Falls (Redwood County) 13.03 inches Granite Falls (Yellow Medicine County) 11.09 inches
Montevideo (Chippewa County) 10.43 inches
Hawley (Clay County) 10.43 inches
Bird Island (Renville County) 10.41 inches
Vesta (Redwood County) 9.62 inches

In addition over 60 new daily rainfall records have been set this month within the Minnesota climate observation network.

First freezing temperatures this month:


On Thursday morning, August 24th, this week the first sub-freezing temperatures were reported with a 32°F reading at Isabella (Lake County), and just 30°F at Crane Lake and Embarrrass (St Louis County). At least 8 other climate stations reported morning lows in the 30s that morning. The readings of 30 degrees F at Embarrass and Crane Lake on August 24th was their first sub-freezing temperature since June 1st, while at Isabella, the 32 degrees F was the first frost since May 19th. It is not unusual to have frost at these locations during the month of August, and more temperature readings in the 30s F (such as occurred again Friday morning) are likely to occur in northern areas later this month.

State Fair time:


The Annual Minnesota State Fair will began Thursday, August 24th and runs through Labor Day, September 4th. It appears that the beginning days of the Fair will be cooler than normal temperatures, perhaps just in the 60s and 70s F. Also there are chances for repeated shower activity over the Friday through Sunday period, then drier next week. I will be at the MPR Booth (corner of Judson and Nelson on the fairgrounds) on two dates: Friday, August 25th at noon to record the TPT Almanac public affairs program with hosts Cathy Wurzer and Eric Eskola; and then again on August 29 (Tue) with host Tom Weber at 11am to broadcast the annual Minnesota Weather Quiz. Please stop by if you are at the Fair either of those days.

Weekly Weather Potpourri:


The NOAA National Hurricane Center was issuing warnings on Hurricane Harvey this week in the Gulf of Mexico. Harvey was expected to strengthen and produce sustained winds up to 120 mph, with higher gusts as it approached the coastline of Texas (around Corpus Christi and northeast to Sargent). Storm surge estimates range from 6 to 12 feet, and rainfall estimates typically range from 15 to 25 inches for this storm. In the Western Pacific Ocean Tropical Storm Pakhar was approaching the Philippines and is expected to bring heavy rains and high seas there for Friday and Saturday.


This week the New York Times published a well-documented study of the loss of permafrost in the state of Alaska. The pace of loss is greatly accelerated in the context of historical climate behavior, and concern is expressed over the amount of carbon that will be released in the thawing of vast amounts of permafrost in the Alaska landscape over the next century.


This week marked the 150th Anniversary of the birth of the iconic "Shipping Forecast" in the United Kingdom, founded by the famous Vice-Admiral Robert FitzRoy who captained the HMS Beagle during Charles Darwin's expedition. The Shipping Forecast is one of the most widely listened to broadcasts on the BBC. The UK Met Office and BBC posted interesting story about this.


Scientists from the University of Copenhagen reported this week from a study of Lake Catalina in East Greenland that using satellite data they have found evidence of four huge outburst floods over the past 50 years, each of which released over a half and up to one cubic mile volume of fresh water into a fjord.

MPR listener question:


I heard you talk to Cathy last week about Redwood Falls having its wettest August in history this year. Isn't August also the month with the most rainfall in history for Minnesota? I want to say this happened in 2007.

Answer:


For an individual location you are right. The all-time state record is 23.86 inches at Hokah (Houston County) in 2007. But on a statewide basis, August has not been our wettest month. Our wettest month on a statewide basis was June 2014 when the average rainfall from all observations across the state was 8.07 inches. List below are the top ten wettest months in history based on the statewide average rainfall reported from all climate stations.

(1) June 2014 8.07”

(2) Tie between July 1897 and June 1914 7.32”

(3) June 1905 6.83”

(4) August 1900 6.80”

(5) June 1915 6.72”

(6) June 1984 6.68”

(7) June 1957 6.67”

(8) June 1925 6.65”

(9) June 1944 6.54”(10)September 2010 6.41”

Twin Cities Almanac for August 25th:

The average MSP high temperature for this date is 79 degrees F (plus or minus 8 degrees F standard deviation), while the average low is 61 degrees F (plus or minus 6 degrees F standard deviation).

MSP Local Records for August 25th:

MSP records for this date include: highest daily maximum temperature of 96 degrees F in 2013; lowest daily maximum temperature of 60 degrees F in 1958; lowest daily minimum temperature of 41 degrees F in 1887; highest daily minimum temperature of 80 degrees F in 2013; record precipitation of 1.51 inches in 1960. No snowfall has occurred on this date.

Average dew point for August 25th is 58°F; the maximum dew point on this date is 75°F in 1990; and the minimum dew point on this date is 26°F in 1934.

All-time state records for August 25th:


The all-time state high temperature for today's date is 102 degrees F at St Vincent (Kittson County) in 1886; the all-time state low for today's date is 25 degrees F at Littlefork (Koochiching County) in 1915. The all-time state record precipitation for this date is 5.08 inches at Pokegama Dam (Itasca County) in 1941. No snow has fallen on this date.

Past Weather Features:


Hot weather prevailed across the state on August 25, 1886. Most areas saw afternoon temperatures climb to 90°F plus, while portions of the Red River Valley recorded afternoon highs of 100 degrees F or greater.

Spectacular northern lights were observed across the sky all over the state of Minnesota on August 25, 1916 from 8pm to midnight. The aurora was so brilliant it was even visible for Twin City’s residents, rare indeed and almost unheard of today.

August 25th in 1917 was a cold one. Five communities in northern Minnesota reported frosts, while a number of communities reported daytime high temperatures that only reached the 60s F, and with a cool northwest wind felt even colder.

A system of organized thunderstorms known as a "derecho" crossed the state over August 25-26, 1990 producing heavy rains and strong winds, estimated at 70 to 80 mph. Many observers reported rains of 3-6 inches which produced widespread flash flooding. The strong winds damaged many farm buildings and caused power outages across Douglas, Grant, Wilkin, Big Stone, and Otter Tail Counties in western sections of the state.

The hottest August 25 in the modern era was in 2013 when over 100 communities reported afternoon temperatures in the 90s F. The afternoon Heat Index surpassed 100 degrees F at a number of locations. The nighttime temperatures were warm too, not falling below 75 degrees F at over 30 locations.

Outlook:


A cloudy weekend coming up with chances for showers and thunderstorms each day. Cooler than normal temperatures will prevail through the weekend. Drier weather on Monday, then a warming trend begins on Tuesday, with a drier pattern in place for much of next week.

Friday, August 18, 2017

What a rainy week!

What a rainy week!

Over the past week many parts of the state have reported rainfalls totaling over 5 inches. Thunderstorms over August 13-14 brought record-setting rainfall to some Minnesota communities, including: 3.75 inches at Montevideo; 3.00 inches at Alexandria; 2.20 inches at Windom; 2.04 inches at Long Prairie; and 1.38 inches at Grand Portage.

Then even heavier rains came over August 16-17 this week, along with a few tornadoes in Nicollet, Sibley, and Blue Earth Counties, all very short-lived. The rainfall in these thunderstorms was record-setting at many locations, even more so than the rains earlier in the week. Some of the new record amounts were:
8.12 inches at Redwood Falls (many flooded basements); 4.11 inches at Willmar; 3.98 inches at Vesta; 3.66 inches at Marshall; 3.57 inches at Montevideo; 3.18 inches at Melrose; 2.88 inches at Pokegama Dam; 2.73 inches at Lake City; 2.67 inches at Pipestone; 2.66 inches at Lakefield; and 2.49 inches at Pine River Dam. The 8.12 inches at Redwood Falls was a new statewide record for August 16th. The Redwood River at River Falls rose nearly 4 feet, while the Minnesota River at Montevideo rose over 6 feet in response to these heavy rains.

No hail reports were associated with these storms, but some thunderstorm associated winds damaged trees in McLeod, Renville, and Redwood Counties.

Redwood Falls with 11.15 inches of rain, and Montevideo with 9.98 inches have already recorded their wettest month of August in history, and there are still two weeks to go. More heavy rain is expected across the southern half of the state over August 20-21.

State Fair Time:


The Annual Minnesota State Fair will begin next Thursday, August 24th and run through Labor Day, September 4th. It appears that the beginning days of the Fair will be sunny and dry with cooler than normal temperatures, perhaps just in the 70s F. I will be at the MPR Booth (corner of Judson and Nelson on the fairgrounds) on two dates: Friday, August 25th at noon to record the TPT Almanac public affairs program with hosts Cathy Wurzer and Eric Eskola; and then again on August 29 (Tue) with host Tom Weber at 11am to broadcast the annual Minnesota Weather Quiz. Please stop by if you are at the Fair either of those days. For other MPR activities and events going on at the State Fair visit the MPR web site.

University of Minnesota Extension will be well represented at the State Fair as well, offering programs and visits with specialists and educators. For more information visit the Extension web site


Weekly Weather Potpourri:

NASA scientists reported this week that wildfires burning just west of the Greenland ice sheet and depositing a great deal of soot and ash on the ice. This may hasten further melting of the Greenland ice sheet for the balance of summer. It was also reported that at least one community in Greenland had dispatched some firefighters to investigate and perhaps even help suppress these fires, which are likely occurring in peatland landscapes.


NOAA reported that the month of July 2017 was the 10th warmest in history across the contiguous USA. In addition they report that the first seven months of 2017 (January through July) were the 2nd warmest in history for the contiguous 48 states, 3.2°F above the 20th Century average.


In related news, the Washington Post reported this week that Death Valley reported the hottest singular month in world history with a July 2017 mean temperature of 107.4 degrees F. This was over 5 degrees above normal for the month there. The extreme high temperature for the month was 127°F on the 7th, while the extreme low temperature was 89°F on the 5th and the 25th. On three nights the temperature never fell lower than 102 degrees F. Other western USA cities like Reno, NV and Salt Lake City, UT also reported their hottest month in history during July of 2017.


In this week’s Earth and Space Science News Sarah Witman reports on the value of expanded rain gauge deployment to help water resource planners better manage streamflow and other hydrologic attributes.

Twin Cities Almanac for August 18th:


The average MSP high temperature for this date is 80 degrees F (plus or minus 7 degrees F standard deviation), while the average low is 62 degrees F (plus or minus 7 degrees F standard deviation).

MSP Local Records for August 18th:

MSP records for this date include: highest daily maximum temperature of 98 degrees F in 1976; lowest daily maximum temperature of 61 degrees F in 1890; lowest daily minimum temperature of 41 degrees F in 1977; highest daily minimum temperature of 77 degrees F in 1916; record precipitation of 2.26 inches in 1907. No snowfall has occurred on this date.

Average dew point for August 18th is 59°F; the maximum dew point on this date is 79°F in 1995; and the minimum dew point on this date is 36°F in 2004.

All-time state records for August 18th:


The all-time state high temperature for today's date is 107 degrees F at Browns Valley (Traverse County) in 1976; the all-time state low for today's date is 24 degrees F at Tower (St Louis County) in 1975. The all-time state record precipitation for this date is 5.78 inches at Artichoke Lake (Big Stone County) in 1935. No snow has fallen on this date.

Past Weather Features:


About 7:30 pm on August 18, 1907 an EF-2 tornado (winds around 135mph) passed near Maple Plain (Hennepin County) destroying 15 cottages on Lake Independence. It was on the ground for 20 miles, killing one person and injuring 15. A barn was destroyed killing five horses inside.

There was an autumn-like chill in the air on August 18, 1915. Some northern Minnesota communities reported frost, and in southern Minnesota at Caledonia (Houston County) the thermometer struggled to climb into the low 60s F.

Widespread frost was reported in northern Minnesota counties on August 18, 1975. At Roseau the morning low was 30 degrees F, and the afternoon sun only warmed the temperature into the upper 50s F, feeling more like October than August.

By far the warmest August 18th in history was in 1976 when 30 Minnesota communities saw the thermometer top 100 degrees F or higher. The temperature at Redwood Falls and Montevideo never dropped lower than 78 degrees F that day.

Persistent thunderstorms brought heavy rains to southern and western Minnesota over August 18-20, 1990. Many areas reported 3 to 6 inches of rainfall and flooded roads were common in Swift, Chippewa, and Kandiyohi Counties.

Outlook:


A mostly sunny weekend with high temperatures near average for this time of year. Then, there will be increasing cloudiness later on Sunday with a chance for showers and thunderstorms by Sunday night. The chance for showers will carry over into Monday with persistent cloudiness that may affect viewing of the eclipse. Cooler and drier will prevail for Tuesday through Thursday of next week.

Friday, August 11, 2017

August climate trends

August climate trends:


Since the record-setting cold August of 2004, the month of August has been warmer than normal 75 percent of the time (9 years out of 12) in Minnesota. Over the same time period the August rainfall has been quite mixed, with 3 years near normal, 4 years drier than normal, and 5 years wetter than normal. Last year, 2016 brought the 7th wettest month of August in state history, with average rainfall across the state totaling close to 5.5 inches.

So far the pattern for this August (2017) has favored cooler than normal temperatures with highly variable rainfall. Brimson, Embarrass, Hibbing and Crane Lake have already reported morning lows in the 30s F. Thunderstorms over August 3-4 brought 1 to 2 inch rains to some parts of the state, and even set new daily records for some climate station. Canby reported a record 1.87 inches of rain on the 3rd, while Rochester and Minnesota City reported record rainfalls on the 4th with 2.01 inches and 2.13 inches respectively. August 9th also brought thunderstorm rainfall to portions of Minnesota with some observers reporting well over 1 inch. Cass Lake (Cass County) reported a record 1.66 inches, while Wadena reported a record 1.41 inches.

For the balance of the month it appears cooler than normal temperatures may persist, and a wetter than normal pattern for the remainder of the month is also projected.

Climate Change and Isle Royale National Park:


I recently visited Isle Royale National Park with my wife. We learned a great deal about the natural resources and wildlife there, even saw some moose. Isle Royale has been in the National Park system since 1940, and there are three automated weather stations deployed across the island, plus the cooperative climate station on Mott Island run by the National Park Service since November of 1940. Data are generally available for the May-September period as the park is not staffed from October through April, except for those conducting biological research. Though climate measurements there are not comprehensive enough to do a trend analysis, most of the warmest summers at Isle Royal have occurred since 1983, with the record warmest in 1998. Because Lake Superior slowly warms all summer, releasing higher quantities of water vapor with each passing month, the wettest months there are traditionally in August and September, when monthly rainfall has exceeded 8 inches.

There are some climate change impacts going on there which have caught the attention of the National Park Service. Some of these include:
-Generally warmer winters have caused less frequent ice bridges which provide a means for wildlife to travel from the island to the mainland (usually Ontario, Canada or Minnesota). This is associated with a decline in the wolf population which now stands at only two.
-With rising temperatures some of the inland lakes on Isle Royale have been warming to the point where cold water fish like the Cisco can no longer survive in them. Water temperatures above 67 degrees F are not suitable for Cisco.
-Some Arctic plant species, like the pale paintbrush, may slowly disappear from the island as a result of warming temperatures.
-Warmer springs are linked to more abundant winter ticks, which live on moose and produce added stress. Moose already suffer from some stress due to warmer summer temperatures, and therefore spend more time in the cool waters of the island.

Obviously as the climate continues to change around Lake Superior, Isle Royale will see even more impacts in the future. More information on climate change as it relates to Isle Royale National Park can be found in a report by the Great Lakes Integrated Sciences andAssessment Program.

Weekly Weather Potpourri:


On Thursday, August 10, NOAA released the 2016State of the Climate Report. It is well worth the read, or at least reading the highlights of the report. Some of the main points included:
-A record warm year globally in 2016, third consecutive year of record warmth
-A record rise in sea level in 2016, and a record high in global sea surface temperature, strong El Nino
-Continued rapid loss of Arctic sea ice, as the Arctic warms at twice the rate of the lower latitudes
-Mass of the Greenland ice sheet reaches a record low in 2016
-a record low spring snow cover was measured over the North American Arctic in 2016


In somewhat related news the Finnish Ice Breaker MSV Nordica set a new record for the shortest transit time through the Arctic Northwest Passage, cutting a path from Alaska to Greenland over a period of just 24 days this summer. You can read more at NOAA News Features.


A recent study from the University of Illinois documents how climate change, through late winter or early spring warming, can cause different grass plants to prematurely break dormancy and start growing rigorously, only to be confused by the shorter days that still persist. They then grow shorter shoots, or stop growing entirely, waiting for day length to get long enough to resume grow.


A study recently published in the journal Science documents that climate change, most notably winter warming, is causing more frequent late winter and early spring flooding across many European watersheds. This is the first comprehensive study that reveals this effect of climate change.

MPR listener question:

Here near Roseau, MN we have recorded no measurable rainfall so far this month. Has there ever been an August with no rainfall?

Answer:

At Roseau the driest August in history was in 1894 when just 0.48 inches of rain fell. There are a few Minnesota climate stations that have recorded a completely dry month of August, including Crookston (Polk County) which received only a trace of rain in August of 1915, and more recently Warren (Marhsall County) which saw no rainfall in August of 2000.

Twin Cities Almanac for August 11th:


The average MSP high temperature for this date is 80 degrees F (plus or minus 7 degrees F standard deviation), while the average low is 61 degrees F (plus or minus 6 degrees F standard deviation).

MSP Local Records for August 11th:

MSP records for this date include: highest daily maximum temperature of 97 degrees F in 1947; lowest daily maximum temperature of 65 degrees F in 1964 and 2004; lowest daily minimum temperature of 47 degrees F in 1968 and 2004; highest daily minimum temperature of 77 degrees F in 1947; record precipitation of 1.73 inches in 2007. No snowfall has occurred on this date.

Average dew point for August 11th is 57F; the maximum dew point on this date is 74F in 2007; and the minimum dew point on this date is 32F in 1999.

All-time state records for August 11th:


The all-time state high temperature for today's date is 105 degrees F at Wheaton (Traverse County) in 1947; the all-time state low for today's date is 28 degrees F at Embarrass (St Louis County) in 199t7. The all-time state record precipitation for this date is 8.06 inches at Hastings (Dakota County) in 1945. No snow has fallen on this date.

Past Weather Features:


Strong thunderstorms crossed the state over August 10-11, 1909 bringing 3 to 5 inches of rain to many areas, especially northern counties. Detroit Lakes reported well over 5 inches, and many farm fields in Becker County were flooded.

A severe thunderstorm passed over Dakota and Goodhue Counties late on August 11 and over the early morning hours of August 12, 1945 bringing 6 to 8 inches of rainfall. Many roads and highways were flooded, along with several farm fields. The Zumbro River rose five feet above flood stage.

The hottest August 11th in state history was in 1947 when 10 Minnesota communities reported afternoon temperatures of 100 degrees F or higher. It was also a difficult night for sleeping as the temperature never dropped below 80 degrees F in some southwestern counties.

The coldest August 11th in state history was in 1997 when overnight temperatures fell into the 30s F across northern Minnesota. Frosts were reported in St Louis and Koochiching Counties.

Outlook:


Mostly sunny and cooler than normal temperatures across the state over the weekend. There will be a chance for scattered showers and thunderstorms later on Sunday, especially in southern counties. Cooler than normal temperatures will continue early next week as well. Temperatures will warm to near normal values by Wednesday with a chance for showers and thunderstorms.
  • © Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved.
  • The University of Minnesota is an equal opportunity educator and employer. Privacy