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Friday, June 15, 2018

Some Perspectives on June Heat

Some Perspectives on June Heat:

On a statewide basis 14 of the past 20 Junes have been warmer than normal, four of them ranking among the 20 warmest in state history.

For the Twin Cities June usually brings 2-3 days with temperatures of 90 degrees F or greater. In some areas of northeastern Minnesota June rarely brings a 90 F day, while in western portions of the state 3-4 days of 90 F temperatures are common.

In the Twin Cities June Heat Waves of two-days duration or longer with a Heat Index Value of 95 degrees F or higher, occur about once every four years. The last prolonged June Heat Wave was in 2001 when Heat Index Values of 95 degrees F or greater were measure for five consecutive days. During June of 1931 there were 7 days with a Heat Index Value of 95 F or higher.

Though we have not seen 90 degrees F this month in the Twin Cities, looks like this Friday, Saturday and Sunday will be our first dose of June Heat with 90 F temperatures and dew points approaching 70 degrees F. Fortunately this heat will be short-lived as we will cool down sharply by Monday of next week.

Weekly Weather Potpourri:

This week NOAA offers a map depiction of SevereWeather Climatology across the country in terms of the historical frequencies of severe weather reports including high winds, hail, severe thunderstorms, and tornadoes.

The UK Meteorological Office provides some insights about what causes the allergy season to sometimes be so severe. They also describe the various pollen seasons and how they are working with the National Health Service to improve forecasts that relate to the pollen seasons.

This week it was reported that New Delhi, India has been experience a prolonged spell of serious air pollution, quite hazardous for transportation due to low visibility, and also for public health as many citizens there have taken to wearing masks. In some areas of the city, pollution has reached 30 times the maximum threshold recommended by the World Health Organization. In addition daily high temperatures have been between 103 degrees F and 110 degrees F.

MPR listener question:

Some of us at Nick’s Downtown Diner in Cannon Falls were remembering this week 6 years ago when we got nearly 9 inches of rain in less than 24-hours and the Cannon River subsequently hit an all-time flood crest. Then Duluth got a 10 inch rainfall the very next week. How many places in Minnesota have recorded 9 or more inches of rain in one day?

Answer:

There are not too many places considering we have nearly 150 years of climate records. Here are those relatively long-term climate stations that have:

Hokah (Houston County) August 19, 2007 15.10 inches
Altura (Winona County) August 19, 2007 11.45 inches
Fort Ripley (Crow Wing County) July 22, 1972 10.84 inches
Two Harbors (Lake County) June 20, 2012 10.45 inches
Duluth (St Louis County) June 19, 2012 (overnight) 10.00 inches
Bagley (Clearwater County) July20, 1909 10.00 inches
Isle (Mille Lacs County) July 22, 1972 9.80 inches
Milan (Chippewa County) July 4, 1995 9.78 inches
Amboy (Blue Earth County) September 23, 2010 9.48 inches
Bricelyn (Faribault County) September 14, 2004 9.22 inches
MSP (Hennepin County) July 23, 1987 9.15 inches
Fosston (Polk County) July 19, 1909 9.00 inches

Twin Cities Almanac for June 15th:


The average MSP high temperature for this date is 79 degrees F (plus or minus 7 degrees F standard deviation), while the average low is 59 degrees F (plus or minus 7 degrees F standard deviation).

MSP Local Records for June 15th:

MSP weather records for this date include: highest daily maximum temperature of 94 degrees F in 1913; lowest daily maximum temperature of 61 degrees F in 1945: lowest daily minimum temperature is 41 degrees F in 1989; highest daily minimum temperature of 71 degrees F in 2007; record precipitation of 2.80 inches in 1874; and there has been no snow on this date.

Average dew point for June 15th is 54 degrees F, with a maximum of 73 degrees F in 1952 and a minimum of 32 degrees F in 1961.

All-time state records for June 15th:


The state record high temperature for this date is 106 degrees F at Lamberton (Redwood County) in 1979. The state record low temperature for this date is 24 degrees F at Meadowlands (St Louis County) in 1917. State record precipitation for this date is 8.83 inches at Cannon Falls (Goodhue County) in 2012; and no snow has fallen on this date in the state.

Past Weather Features:

Frost came to many northern parts of Minnesota on June 15, 1917. Over a dozen communities saw the thermometer drop into the 20s F overnight, and 25 counties reported frost. In some cases it was damaging to the wheat crop.

The hottest June 15th statewide was in 1979 when over a dozen communities reported a temperature of 100 degrees F or better. Most of the state was blanketed by 90 F temperatures, the cool spot being Two Harbors with 78 degrees F. In many areas the temperature never dropped below 70 degrees F overnight. The heat had little damaging effect on crops, as it was a late planting season and many crops were in the early stages of growth.

Intense thunderstorms brought massive flooding to portions of Goodhue, Rice, and Dakota Counties over June 14-15, 2012. Rainfall amounts of 5 to nearly 9 inches were reported. Many roads were closed and a record flood crest went down the Cannon River.

Outlook


Hot, sticky weekend coming up, especially south of the I94 corridor. Many will see high temperatures in the 90s F and warm nights in the 70s F. Chance for showers and thunderstorms as well, especially on Saturday night and early Sunday. Cooler on Monday and Tuesday, then warming a bit on Wednesday and Thursday.

Friday, June 8, 2018

June off to a mixed start


June off to a mixed start


Following a near historic warm May (4th warmest in state history), through the first week of June the pattern of temperature across Minnesota is mixed with near normal or cooler than normal temperatures dominating northern counties and above normal temperatures prevalent across the central and southern counties. Fifteen climate stations in the south have already seen 90 degrees F or higher this month, topped by 99°F at Marshall. In the north as per usual Brimson, Embarrass, and Hibbing have reported frosty mornings in June with some temperatures below 32 degrees F. Of course bear in mind that those places in Minnesota have reported below freezing temperatures in every month of the year.


From the standpoint of moisture many northern parts of the state have already measured from 1 to 2 inches of rainfall in June, and a few places over two inches. Some parts of southeastern Minnesota which were very wet in May have seen little precipitation so far, with many reporting less than a quarter of an inch.


June is expected to continue to be warmer than normal around most of the state, and wetter than normal as well.

Weekly Weather Potpourri:


NOAA reported earlier this week that May of 2018 was the warmest in history on a nationwide basis, surpassing the record warmth of May of 1934 by 0.7 degrees F. Further over 8600 daily temperature records were set or tied during the month across the nation. Overall the minimum temperatures in May deviated from the norm, more than the maximum temperatures, a trend very evident in Minnesota over the past two decades.

June 11-13 NOAA is sponsoring a workshop in Flagstaff, AZ to assess “The Changing Southwest Environment: Trends &Challenges.” During 2017 both Arizona and New Mexico reported their warmest years in history. Along with increasing and persistent drought and increased fire danger there, state and local unites of government are giving more attention to climate issues than ever before.


The NOAA National Hurricane Center was reporting the Aletta was intensifying well off the west coast of Mexico in the Eastern Pacific Ocean. On Thursday it had reported wind speeds of 100 mph. Fortunately it was expected to remain out to sea over the weekend, though it will produce some large waves along the coastal areas of Mexico.


AGU provides a narrative and review this week about Michael Mann's new book " The Tantrum that Saved the World." It is an interesting read about the acceptance of climate change as an important societal issue.

MPR listener question:


Here in Dodge County we have hardly seen any rainfall so far in June. The boys in the coffee shop were asking if there has ever been a June with zero rainfall? We thought we would ask you.

Answer:


To the best of my knowledge there has never been a June with zero rainfall in Dodge County, MN. However in Rochester during June of 1910 there was no rain at all recorded. One of the rare times this has happened anywhere in the state.

Twin Cities Almanac for June 8th:


The average MSP high temperature for this date is 77 degrees F (plus or minus 9 degrees F standard deviation), while the average low is 56 degrees F (plus or minus 7 degrees F standard deviation).

MSP Local Records for June 8th:

MSP weather records for this date include: highest daily maximum temperature of 102 degrees F in 1985; lowest daily maximum temperature of 54 degrees F in 1937: lowest daily minimum temperature is 36 degrees F in 1885; highest daily minimum temperature of 71 degrees F in 2012; record precipitation of 2.12 inches in 1918; and there has been no snow on this date.

Average dew point for June 8th is 53 degrees F, with a maximum of 78 degrees F in 1911 and a minimum of 31 degrees F in 1980.

All-time state records for June 8th:


The state record high temperature for this date is 102 degrees F at Chaska (Carver County) in 1985. The state record low temperature for this date is 20 degrees F at Sawbill Camp (Cook County) in 1935. State record precipitation for this date is 8.07 inches at Thief River Falls (Pennington County) in 2001; and no snow has fallen on this date in the state.

Past Weather Features


June 8, 1985 was the hottest in state history. Over two-thirds of the state saw temperatures soar to 90 degrees F or higher. Twenty-five climate stations reached 100 degrees F or greater. Fortunately temperatures cooled off into the 60s F by June 11th.


One of the stormiest and wettest periods of history in northwestern Minnesota was over June 8-11, 2002. Numerous thunderstorms followed the same path across many northwestern counties bringing 5 to 10 inches of rain. Portions of Lake of the Woods County saw up to a foot of rain fall. The Roseau River reached an all-time flood crest, as a result of these storms.

Outlook


Continued warmer than normal temperatures throughout the weekend with a chance for showers and thunderstorms on Saturday, then drier Sunday. There will be a chance for more rain on Monday, then somewhat cooler temperatures for Tuesday and Wednesday.

 

Friday, June 1, 2018

May Climate Summary

May 2018 Climate Summary:


After recording the second coldest April in state history (trailing only 1950), May took off in the opposite direction to finish as the third warmest in state (trailing only 1977 and 1934). In fact for the Twin Cities back to 1873 May of 2018 was the 2nd warmest in history (mean temperature 67.8°F in 2018 compared to 68.7°F in May of 1934). Most climate observers reported a mean monthly temperature for May that was 5 to 8 degrees F warmer than normal. Over 60 percent of the state landscape saw at least one day with a temperature of 90 degrees F or higher, while at least 15 communities recorded a maximum temperature of 100 degrees F or warmer, topped by 102 degrees F at Amboy (Blue Earth County) and Madison (Lac Qui Parle County) on the 28th. In fact places in Minnesota were hotter than Tucson or Phoenix, Arizona on May 28th, an unusual occurrence historically. MSP for the first time reported six consecutive days in May with 90 F temperatures or greater (the 23rd to the 29th). Within the Minnesota state climate station network 109 daily maximum temperature records were tied or broken during the month. The lowest temperature measured during May in Minnesota was 21 degrees F at Brimson and Cook (St Louis County) on the 11th.

May of 2018 was generally drier than normal in central and northern counties and wetter than normal in southern counties. Many southern communities reported 6 to 9 inches of rainfall during the month. With the climate station network 35 new daily rainfall records were set during the month. In southeastern Minnesota both Hokah and Houston reported new total May rainfall records of over 9 inches. In some southern Minnesota counties planting progress for this year's corn and soybean crops was exceedingly slow, going until the end of the month. At month’s end approximately 56 percent of the state landscape was drier than normal, mostly in the central and northern parts.

Weekly Weather Potpourri:


NOAA features a wide range of climate adaptation and climate resilience training courses with a number of practical applications that may apply to your community. These courses are worth checking out to see if they apply to your local community situation.

NOAA forecasters also predicted a near or above normal Atlantic Hurricane Season during 2018, with a likelihood of 10 to 16 named storms. Near or above normal numbers of tropical storms are also expected for the Eastern and Central Pacific Ocean regions during 2018.

Heavy rains and thunderstorms plagued portions of the United Kingdom on Thursday and Friday, bringing flooded streets, as well as rail and air traffic delays. Some of the storms delivered 2 to 4 inches of rain, especially to parts of Wales, Northern Ireland and Ireland. More heavy rains are expected over Scotland this weekend.

Geophysical Research Letters featured a study recently from scientists at Portland State University showing a strong relationships between lightning strikes initiated wildfires and global climate change (warming temperatures) in the Mediterranean counties as well as those in the temperature zones of the Southern Hemisphere.

MPR listener question:

Did anyone in Minnesota report snow during the month of May 2018?

Answer:

The only report of snow was a trace on May 11th at Pipestone, perhaps unexpected after such a snowy April.

Twin Cities Almanac for June 1st:

The average MSP high temperature for this date is 73 degrees F (plus or minus 9 degrees F standard deviation), while the average low is 53 degrees F (plus or minus 7 degrees F standard deviation).

MSP Local Records for June 1st:

MSP weather records for this date include: highest daily maximum temperature of 92 degrees F in 1939; lowest daily maximum temperature of 51 degrees F in 1945: lowest daily minimum temperature is 37 degrees F in 1946; highest daily minimum temperature of 72 degrees F in 1939; record precipitation of 237 inches in 2014; and there was a trace snow in St Paul on this date in 1946.

Average dew point for June 1st is 48 degrees F, with a maximum of 73 degrees F in 1944 and a minimum of 29 degrees F in 1910.

All-time state records for June1st:


The state record high temperature for this date is 105 degrees F at Chaska (Carver County) in 1934. The state record low temperature for this date is 15 degrees F at Bigfork (Itasca County) in 1964. State record precipitation for this date is 7.98 inches at Stillwater (Washington County) in 1967; and only traces of snow have fallen on this date historically, mostly in northern Minnesota counties.

Past Weather Features:


Following the warmest May in state history, June 1, 1934 was the hottest in history as well, with a dozen communities reporting afternoon temperatures of 100 degrees F or greater. At Winona the temperature never fell below 79 degrees F, even at night.

By far the coldest June 1st in state history occurred in 1964. Over 50 Minnesota climate stations reported frost, and four communities in northern Minnesota saw temperatures drop into the teens F. Frost was reported in Wabasha County where some corn fields had to be replanted.

Persistent thunderstorms brought record setting rainfall to many parts of Minnesota over May 31 to June 2, 1965. Areas around the Twin Cities Metro Counties reported 4 to 6 inches, and widespread flooding of roads and highways occurred. The Mississippi River between St Paul and Hastings rose again after having receded from record flooding earlier that spring.

Outlook:


Mostly cloudy on Saturday statewide with a chance for showers and thunderstorms, along with cooler than normal temperatures. Continuing cooler than normal on Sunday, with breezy NW winds, but more sun than cloud. Warming trend begins on Monday taking temperatures back to a few degrees warmer than normal. Another chance for showers and thunderstorms by Wednesday and Thursday of next week.




Monday, May 28, 2018

Hot, with a Dry Pattern Emerging in the North

Hot, with a Dry Pattern Emerging in the North:

Nearly through the month of May now and a pronounced dry pattern has emerged in the northern part of Minnesota. Some climate stations are 1.5 to 3.0 inches below normal for the month and 3 to 5 inches below normal since April 1st. Over 50 percent of the state’s landscape is abnormally dry, while portions of Beltrami, Lake of the Woods, Roseau, and Koochiching Counties are in moderate drought according to the U.S. Drought Monitor.

Persistent warmer than normal temperatures for the balance of May will exacerbate the dryness, as daytime highs consistently reach 85 to 100 degrees F in many parts of the state. In fact based on the forecasts through May 31 the state will record one of the hottest months of May in history ranking with 1977, 1934, and 1988. Though statewide temperature records have not been broken, Fairmont, Tracy, Worthington, Canby, and Madison have all seen the mercury rise to 100 degrees F this month (on the 27th). The Twin Cities will likely record its 2nd hottest May , surpassed only by that of 1934 when a temperature of 106 degrees F closed the month on the 31st. For the Twin Cities only three other Mays have brought 4 consecutive days with temperatures in the 90s F, and those were 1874, 1934, and 1988. It is likely the Twin Cities will record 6 consecutive days in the 90s F during the current Heat Wave. More about May Heat Waves can be found at the Minnesota State Climatology Office web site.

Widespread showers and thunderstorms may help offset this warmth, but I suspect by the end of the month more counties in Minnesota may fall into the moderate drought category as well. The outlook for June favors continued warm temperatures but equal chances for above or below normal precipitation.

Heat as a Health Risk for School Children

A recent Facebook post by Joe Nathan, former Director of the Center for School Change at the Humphrey Institute made me think more about climate change and school safety in Minnesota. Besides severe weather (tornadoes, severe thunderstorms, flash flooding), heat is one of the most serious threats to the health of school children, in many areas the most serious. Fortunately in our Minnesota climate history we have recorded relatively few episodes of this, with sporadic days of 90 degree F heat in May and September. The frequency of extreme heat during the school year is likely to continue to increase as our climate changes, and we already have evidence for this emerging in the trends of recent years. Since 2000 there have been 7 Mays that have brought two or more days of 90°F temperatures, and 7 Septembers (including the record-setting hot one of 2016) that have produced similar frequency of 90 degree F heat.

The current Heat Wave episode around the state has brought 5-6 consecutive days of 90 degree F temperatures to scores of communities, with 100°F reached in a number of western Minnesota locations. Many of these days occurred over the Memorial Weekend when schools were closed. Nevertheless, many schools are not air conditioned and structurally designed so that they store a great deal of heat. In this context, when schools resume on May 29th, it is likely that the buildings will be quite hot and uncomfortable, most likely to the extent that children will not be able to be as attentive as needed in the classroom, and perhaps will need reminders about drinking water to stay hydrated, and not overdoing exercise at recess. In this context there should be more administrative attention paid to policy guidelines for limited recess, earlier than normal dismissal, nurse staffing, school cancellations, etc. These threats to children’s health are very real and should be seriously considered……..many scientists like myself would simply say this is an important “climate adaptation” that should not be ignored.

Weekly Weather Potpourri:


TropicalCyclone Sagar in the Gulf of Aden made landfall in Somalia last week. It is quite rare for the Horn of Africa to be affected by tropical cyclones. According to weather records only two other tropical cyclones have made landfall in this part of Africa, one in 2015 and one in 1984. Sagar brought heavy rains and flash flooding to parts of Somalia which has been mostly in drought over the past five years.

Speaking of tropical cyclones, Cyclone Mekunu was heading for the coasts of Yemen and Oman in the Middle East this week. It is a significant storm with large bands of heavy rain, wind gusts over 100 mph and sea waves of 25-30 feet. It is expected to make landfall by Saturday.

TropicalStorm Alberto will bring strong winds, high seas, and heavy rain to the Florida Panhandle this weekend. Rainfall totals of 8 to 12 inches are possible for parts of Florida, and some areas will see winds well over 50 mph.

MPR listener question:

Seeing the forecast for a hot weekend made me wonder how often do temperatures reach 90 degrees F or warmer in the Twin Cities over Memorial Weekend?

Answer:

Over the past 145 years in the Twin Cities climate record the daily maximum temperature has reached 90 degrees F on at least one day of the Memorial Weekend 20 times, or about one year in every 7. So this is somewhat unusual. The consecutive days of temperatures of 90 degrees F or higher is much more unusual.

Twin Cities Almanac for May 25th

The average MSP high temperature for this date is 72 degrees F (plus or minus 9 degrees F standard deviation), while the average low is 52 degrees F (plus or minus 8 degrees F standard deviation).

MSP Local Records for May 25th:

MSP records for this date include: highest daily maximum temperature of 94 degrees F in 1978; lowest daily maximum temperature of 48 degree F in 1904; lowest daily minimum temperature of 33 degrees F in 1901; highest daily minimum temperature of 70 degrees F in 1914; record precipitation of 1.88 inches in 1942. No snowfall has occurred on this date.

Average dew point for May 25th is 47°F; the maximum dew point on this date is 72°F in 1916; and the minimum dew point on this date is 23°F in 1998.

All-time state records for May 25th:


The all-time state high temperature for today's date is 100 degrees F at Luverne (Rock County) in 1967; the all-time state low for today's date is 19 degrees F at Tower (St Louis County) in 1983. The all-time state record precipitation for this date is 4.32 inches at St James (Watonwan County) in 1953. Record snowfall is 4.0 inches at Baudette (Lake of the Woods County) in 1970.

Past Weather Features:

Strong thunderstorms brought 2-5 inches of rain to many parts of southern Minnesota on May 25, 1953. Some county roads in Pipestone and Watonwan Counties were washed out and had to be repaired in the middle of the planting season.


An unusual storm brought 2-4 inches of snow across portions of Beltrami, Koochiching, and Lake of the Woods Counties over May 25-26, 1970. Some fishermen on Lake of the Woods had to bring their boat ashore as they could not see in the heavy snowfall, with 4 inches falling in just over 2 hours.


By far the warmest May 25th in state history was in 1967 when over 30 communities reported daytime highs of 90 degrees F or greater. There was a risk of wildfires too as winds were gusty and relative humidity was very low that day.


Widespread frosts occurred in northern and western parts of Minnesota on May 25, 1983. Many climate stations reported morning lows ranging from 20 degrees F to 30 degrees F. Where crop damage was significant, fields were replanted.

Outlook:


A hot conclusion to May. Many areas will see daytime highs in the 90s over the weekend, perhaps the mid 90s on Sunday. Chance for showers and thunderstorms by late Monday and next Tuesday and Wednesday with daytime temperatures dropping back into the 80s F, still warmer than normal for this time of year.

Friday, May 18, 2018

Warm May Continues

Warm May Continues:


Temperatures continue to average well above normal this month. May 16th brought daytime temperatures of 85 to 90 degrees F to over 60 communities across the state, topped by 91 degrees F at Montevideo (Chippewa County) and 90 degrees F at Artichoke Lake (Big Stone County). So far this month temperatures are averaging 4 to 6 degrees F warmer than normal in most places and at least a dozen climate stations have reported one new daily record high. The warm weather combined with several dry days allowed for Minnesota farmers to catch up a bit on planting crops. Over 50 percent of the roughly 7 million acres of corn has been planted. But in southeastern Minnesota counties where over 6 inches of rain has fallen so far this month, there are still fields too wet to plant. Undoubtedly over the next week as corn planting wraps up, farmers will move onto planting soybeans.

Weekly Weather Potpourri:


Nearly a month’s worth of wildfires has plagued portions of eastern Siberia in Russia. Over 16 square miles of landscape has burned and ashes and smoke have displaced some residents there. This area of Russia has seen an increased frequency of wildfires due to a warming climate over the past decade or so according to the Weather Underground.

A recent article in Frontiers in MarineScience documents how climate change across Greenland in recent decades has changed the behavioral pattern and habitat range for polar bears there. This has been well documented by the Inuit hunters.

Dr. Harold Brooks from the NOAA National Severe Storms Laboratory in Oklahoma, along with other NOAA scientists has published a daily climatological perspective on the frequency of tornadoes across the country. Some parts of southern Minnesota fall into the same daily probability category as parts of Kansas.


With expected sunshine and nearly ideal temperature conditions the BBC expects huge crowds to show up near Windsor to watch the carriages go by for the Royal Wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle on Saturday (May 19).

MPR listener question:

What is the latest date for snow in the Twin Cities, and what about statewide? Has there ever been snow in June?

Answer:

The latest date for measurable snowfall in the Twin Cities climate record is May 24, 1925 when 0.1 inches of snow was reported. There was a trace of snow as late as June 1, 1946 in St Paul. On a statewide basis 1.5 inches of snow fell at Mizpah (Koochiching County) on June 4, 1935, the latest date in the state records.

Twin Cities Almanac for May18th:


The average MSP high temperature for this date is 70 degrees F (plus or minus 11 degrees F standard deviation), while the average low is 50 degrees F (plus or minus 7 degrees F standard deviation).

MSP Local Records for May18th:

MSP records for this date include: highest daily maximum temperature of 93 degrees F in 2012; lowest daily maximum temperature of 45 degree F in 1890; lowest daily minimum temperature of 27 degrees F in 1915; highest daily minimum temperature of 68 degrees F in 1911; record precipitation of 1.57 inches in 1892. Record snowfall on this date is 2.0 inches in 1915.

Average dew point for May18th is 46°F; the maximum dew point on this date is 69°F in 1962; and the minimum dew point on this date is 20°F in 1981.

All-time state records for May 18th:


The all-time state high temperature for today's date is 101 degrees F at Fairmont (Martin County) in 1934; the all-time state low for today's date is 16 degrees F at Duluth (St Louis County) in 1924. The all-time state record precipitation for this date is 5.01 inches at Lanesboro (Fillmore County) in 2000. Record snowfall is 3.0 inches at Minneapolis (Hennepin County) in 1915.

Past Weather Features


Snow fell across portions of Minnesota on May 18 in both 1915 and 1968. In 1915 snowfall ranging from 1 to 3 inches fell mostly across central and northern Minnesota counties. In 1968 from 1 to 3 inches of snow fell across portions of northeastern Minnesota, and portions of Highways 61 and 2 we reported to be slippery with ice.

A late spring freeze caused damage to small grains in northern Minnesota on May 18, 1924. Over 20 climate stations reported morning lows in the 20s F, while the daytime temperature never rose above 38 degrees F at International Falls.

By far the warmest May 18 in state history was in 1934 when over 20 communities reported an afternoon high of 90 degrees F or greater. Both Pipestone and Fairmont surpassed 100 degrees F, and the temperature at Albert Lea never dropped below 69 degrees F even at night.

Outlook:

Chance of scattered showers and thunderstorms Saturday through Monday with temperatures slightly either side of normal for this time of year. A warmer than normal temperature trend will begin by next Tuesday and much of next week will be dry as well.



Friday, May 11, 2018

Warm Start to May, But Way Behind on Planting

Warm Start to May, But Way Behind on Planting:

So far temperatures are averaging above normal for the month of May. Over the first ten days average daily temperature is 1 to 3 degrees F above normal in the north, and 5 to 8 degrees F above normal in southern counties. On May 7th it was as warm as 89 degrees F at Crookston, Wheaton, and Granite Falls. Except for the far north, few places have reported a frost in May. For the Twin Cities it is the warmest first ten days of May (ave temp about 64°F) since the year 2000. As a result of the warmth, more lakes are expected to lose ice before the Fishing Opener on Saturday, but some in the far north will obviously still have ice.

Thunderstorms have brought heavy rains to southern parts of the state. Already places like Caledonia, Houston, Harmony, and Lanesboro have seen over 4 inches for the month. At least 16 daily rainfall records have been tied or broken within the Minnesota climate network, including 2.23” at Harmony on the 2nd, 1.94” at Caledonia on the 4th, and 1.43” at Grand Meadow on the 4th.

Because of wet soils, only recently have farmers been making progress on planting corn around the state, mostly in western and central counties. Many southern counties remain too wet. For the week ending on May 6th only 9 percent of the corn was planted. Hopefully a mostly dry next week will allow for a great deal of corn planting.

Weekly Weather Potpourri:


NOAA features an article by Rebecca Lindsey this week about the signature warmth of the year 2016 in the Arctic region, where some daily temperature departures were 30 to 40 degrees F warmer than normal. She documents how this unprecedented warmth is definitely a signature of climate change, and describes the evidence.

Earlier this week the BBC reported the warmest early May Bank Holiday in the modern record for the United Kingdom, with temperatures soaring into the 80s F, and many citizens flocking to the beaches. Temperatures were averaging a good 15-20 degrees F warmer than normal over the first weekend of the month.

The Yale Climate Connections this week features an interview by Amy Brady with Richard Powers, author of “The Overstory.” He talks about the legacy of the battle to preserve the majestic northwest woods and forests and how people from different walks of life commonly value such features.

MPR listener question:

My goodness ( I usually use stronger language, but in case this gets on the radio) here near Caledonia we have already received nearly 5 inches of rain this month, keeping me out of my fields. I just hope to get planted by Memorial Day. Can you tell me the record amount of rainfall for the month of May here?


Answer:

The record May rainfall at Caledonia (Houston County) is 11.63 inches in 2004. It rained on 21 days that month. That broke an old record of 11.13 inches of rain during May of 1902. BTW in 2013 the month of May brought 14.64 inches of rain to Grand Meadow (Mower County) just a little west of you. This is a state record.

Twin Cities Almanac for May 11th:

The average MSP high temperature for this date is 68 degrees F (plus or minus 11 degrees F standard deviation), while the average low is 47 degrees F (plus or minus 8 degrees F standard deviation).

MSP Local Records for May 11th: MSP weather records for this date include: highest daily maximum temperature of 88 degrees F in 1900; lowest daily maximum temperature of 40 degrees F in 1914 and 1966; lowest daily minimum temperature of 27 F in 1946; highest daily minimum temperature of 64 F in 1881, 1915 and 1922; record precipitation of 1.55 inches in 1935 (2.10 inches in the Pioneer records of 1882); and 2.8 inches of snowfall was recorded on this date in 1946.

Average dew point for May 11th is 40 degrees F, with a maximum of 66 degrees F in 1922 and a minimum of 14 degrees F in 1946.

All-time state records for May 11th:

The state record high temperature for this date is 104 degrees F at Blue Earth (Faribault County) in 2011. The state record low temperature for this date is 11 degrees F at Fosston (Polk County) in 1946; state record precipitation for this date is 4.60 inches at Crookston (Polk County) in 1922; and state record snowfall for this date is 3.0 inches at Isle (Mille Lacs County County) in 1966 and at Tower (St Louis County) in 2008.

Past Weather Features:

The coldest May 11th in state history was in 1946 when 30 climate stations reported a morning low temperature in the teens. The high temperature at Warroad never rose above 32 degrees F that day.

A rare May snow storm slowed the pace of corn planting on May 11, 1966. Many parts of southern and central Minnesota reported 1 to 3 inches of snow. Fortunately it was very short-lived, and corn planting resumed in two days.

On a statewide basis, May 11, 1987 was the warmest in state history with over 30 climate stations reporting afternoon highs of 90 degrees F or higher. Afternoon relative humidity values ranged from the teens into the 20s F making for a high risk fire danger as well.

Outlook:

Generally cloudy and cooler than normal with a chance for showers in the south on Saturday. Partly cloudy and warmer on Sunday, with a return of above normal temperatures. Sunny and warmer yet on Monday, then a chance for showers later on Tuesday. Then generally dry much of the rest of next week.











Friday, May 4, 2018

Time for Farmers and Gardeners

Time for Farmers and Gardeners:


As the soil has warmed up, and fields have dried out, many Minnesota farmers are just starting to take equipment out into the fields to prepare for planting, one of the latest planting seasons in state history. The latest planting season in my memory as Extension Climatologist was 1979, when half of the state’s corn acreage (about 7 million acres) did not get planted until May 21st, and half of the soybean crop until May 27th. That made for a late and wet fall harvest season in 1979 because farmers had to wait for the corn crop to mature. Perhaps modern corn hybrids dry down faster than the old ones, but it still makes farmers antsy to be planting so late. I suspect farmers will be working 20 hour days until they get their crops in the ground.

Gardeners who are eager to get going should probably begin to remove mulch, fertilize, plant seeds, and transplant those seedlings that were started indoors. There is little threat of frost on the horizon, especially across southern Minnesota counties. In fact the month of May is more likely to turn out warmer than normal, as opposed to last month. Soil temperatures are no longer an impediment to planting.

Who Would Have Thought?


With one of the top 5 coldest Aprils in state history, who would have guessed the last day of the month would bring such remarkable temperatures (12 to 15 degrees F above normal). Over 50 climate stations reported an afternoon high temperature of 80 degrees F or greater, topped by 85 degrees F at Marshall. The Twin Cities hit 84 degrees F, a temperature only seen in April about once in every five years!

Weekly Weather Potpourri:


Today, May 4th is National Weather Observers Day. Hats off and thanks to all the thousands of citizens who voluntarily record the daily weather for the NOAA-National Weather Service, State Climatology Office, and other monitoring agencies throughout the USA. In Minnesota we are blessed to have well over 1500 such volunteers.

East-central and north-central counties of Minnesota remain in a high fire danger category. With no major rain storms expected over the next several days, there is likely to be a high fire danger through the weekend. Some afternoon relative humidity readings will hover in the range of only 15 to 20 percent.

Earlier this week, the Yale Climate Connection pointed out a very interesting essay published by Rosemary Randall, titled the “The id and the eco.” This article deals with not only the cognitive side of the climate change issue, but the emotional side and how it stands in the way of having open dialogue among our communities.

The United Kingdom Meteorological Office features an interesting article about Hay Fever this week, debunking the myth that it can spread from person to person. Given that the pollen season is upon us here in Minnesota, it might be worth a read.

MPR listener question:


I am a resident of Lake City, MN. I noticed that ice-out on Lake Pepin did not occur this year until April 20th, but that was not a record for lateness. According to the DNR, ice out on Lake Pepin in 1843 was not until May 20th. Still this year seems unusually late for ice-out down here. How does it rank historically?

Answer:


The April 20th date for ice-out on Lake Pepin ranks as the 6th latest in history, tied with 1869, 1875, 1885, and 1899. It was the latest ice out date since 1904 (April 21). As you know, ice-out is an important date for barge traffic to resume on the Mississippi River.

Twin Cities Almanac for May 4th


The average MSP high temperature for this date is 66 degrees F (plus or minus 11 degrees F standard deviation), while the average low is 45 degrees F (plus or minus 9 degrees F standard deviation).

MSP Local Records for May 4th:

MSP records for this date include: highest daily maximum temperature of 91 degrees F in 1952; lowest daily maximum temperature of 36 degree F in 1944; lowest daily minimum temperature of 22 degrees F in 1967; highest daily minimum temperature of 65 degrees F in 1934; record precipitation of 1.01 inches in 1959. Record snowfall on this date is 2.0 inches in 1890.

Average dew point for May 4th is 40°F; the maximum dew point on this date is 73°F in 1912; and the minimum dew point on this date is 13°F in 1957.

All-time state records for May 4th:


The all-time state high temperature for today's date is 96 degrees F at Montevideo (Chippewa County) and Wheaton (Traverse County) in 1949; the all-time state low for today's date is 8 degrees F at Cloquet (Carlton County) in 1911. The all-time state record precipitation for this date is 4.00 inches at Blanchard (Morrison County) in 1949. Record snowfall is 5.0 inches at Mankato (Blue Earth County) in 1890.

Past Weather Features:


An unusual storm brought 2-4 inches of snowfall across the state over May 4-5, 1890. Though short-lived, cool temperatures following the storm kept farmers from planting for over two weeks.

The two warmest May 4ths in state history were in 1949 and 1952. Scores of communities reported afternoon high temperatures in the 90s F, and as is common for that time of year, the fire danger was high in western Minnesota counties with very low relative humidity as well.

May 4, 1974 brought a hard freeze to much of northern and western Minnesota. Morning lows fell into the 20s F at more than 40 climate stations and it was just 12 degrees F at Tower (St Louis County). Many gardeners complained of plants being damaged by the freeze, but most plants recovered.

Outlook:

Weekend will start out warmer than normal, with a chance for widely scattered showers or thunderstorms late in the day on Saturday. Then, a cool down on Sunday with temperatures closer to normal for this time of year. Generally dry until Tuesday and Wednesday when there will be a widespread chance for showers and thunderstorms, followed by a sunny period towards the end of next week.














Friday, April 27, 2018

Preeliminary Climate Summary for April

 Preliminary Climate Summary for April:


April of 2018 will be remembered as cold and snowy for most Minnesota citizens. The average temperature for most communities ranged from 9 to 12 degrees F colder than normal. On a statewide basis it was the 5th coldest April back to 1895, only 1950, 1907, 1909, and 1920 were colder. For the Twin Cities (MSP) it was the 4th coldest April back to 1873, only 1874, 1907, and 1950 were colder. Within the Minnesota climate network over 500 daily record cold minimum temperature or cold maximum temperature records were set or tied. Extreme temperatures for the month ranged from -11 degrees F at Ely on the 8th, to over 80 degrees F at several locations on April 30th (forecasted to be that high). Roughly 85 percent of all days in April brought cooler than normal temperature conditions.

Moisture-wise the southern counties were generally wetter than normal, while the north was drier than normal. Many southern communities reported 3 to 4 inches of precipitation, while some northern climate stations received less than 1.5 inches. Snowfall was a big headline during April, as many Minnesota climate stations reported record amounts. The largest storm was the blizzard and heavy snow over April 13-16. MSP reported 15.8 inches of snowfall during that storm, the 12th highest snow storm total in history. You can view the others ranked among the top 20 historically at
the Minnesota State Climatology Office web site.

Over 150 daily snowfall records were broken or tied within the state climate network during the month. In addition, over 100 observers reported 20 inches or more during the month. New records for total April snowfall were common, including:

33.3” at Bricelyn
32.1” at Lakefield
27.0” at Albert Lea
29.6” at Lake Wilson
31.5” at Winnebago
22.9” at Waseca
37.0” at Tracy
23.0” at Lake City
36.9” at Canby
26.1” at MSP
26.0” at St James

Weekly Weather Potpourri:


April has been an windy and dry month in Oklahoma. This has produced a number of wild fires which have been a serious threat there. NOAA this week features an article about the conditions that have caused these fires. Nearly 300,000 acres of land has been burned in Oklahoma so far this month. Firefighters are still struggling to control them in some areas.

Tornado Alley has been unusually quiet so far in 2018. For states like Oklahoma, Texas, Kansas, Nebraska, and Missouri this may be one of the latest starts ever to the severe weather season. Little or no tornado activity has been reported from many of these states. You can read more from the BBC.

Sea-level rise and wave-driven flooding will negatively impact freshwater resources on many low-lying atoll islands in such a way that many could be uninhabitable in just a few decades. A recent U.S. Geological Survey study suggests that many of these islands in the Western Pacific and the Indian Ocean may become uninhabitable in the next several decades as they lose freshwater supply.

A recent article in EOS documents how satellite data are now more frequently helping meteorologists forecast snowfall rates. This is a big step forward in forecasting and may be applied more broadly in the future.

MPR listener question:

I heard you say last week the Tracy, MN (Lyon County) had reported a record 37 inches of snow for the month. What is the state record for the month of April?

Answer:

Actually there have been two Aprils in the past ten years when some Minnesota climate stations reported over 40 inches of snowfall, both 2008 and 2013. The all-time April snowfall record is from Island Lake, just outside Duluth on the north shore of Lake Superior where they received 55.6 inches in 2013. That particular April also brought over 50 inches of snowfall to Duluth and Two Harbors.

Twin Cities Almanac for April 27th:


The average MSP high temperature for this date is 63 degrees F (plus or minus 11 degrees F standard deviation), while the average low is 42 degrees F (plus or minus 9 degrees F standard deviation).

MSP Local Records for April 27th:

MSP records for this date include: highest daily maximum temperature of 85 degrees F in 1977; lowest daily maximum temperature of 34 degree F in 1950; lowest daily minimum temperature of 21 degrees F in 1909; highest daily minimum temperature of 60 degrees F in 1938 and 1974; record precipitation of 2.22 inches in 1975. Record snowfall on this date is 8.5 inches in 1907.

Average dew point for April 27th is 36°F; the maximum dew point on this date is 65°F in 1986; and the minimum dew point on this date is 8°F in 1934.

All-time state records for April 27th:


The all-time state high temperature for today's date is 96 degrees F at Hallock (Kittson County) in 1952; the all-time state low for today's date is 7 degrees F at Brimson (St Louis County) in 1996. The all-time state record precipitation for this date is 3.76 inches at Cambridge (Isanti County) in 1975. Record snowfall is 14.0 inches at Ottertail (Otter Tail County) in 2008.

Past Weather Features:


At the end of a snowy month, April 27, 1909 brought many record cold temperatures including single digit lows to many northern Minnesota communities. The afternoon high temperature at Roseau and Baudette on that day was only 30 degrees F, with snow still on the ground.

By far the warmest April 27th in state history was in 1952 when afternoon high temperatures of 90 degrees F or greater were reported from over 20 communities around the state. There was also high fire danger as some afternoon relative humidity readings were less than 20 percent.

A big late season snow storm on April 27, 2008 made travel very difficult across sections of northern Minnesota. Some climate stations reported 6 to 14 inches of heavy, wet snow.

Outlook:

Sunny, but cooler than normal on Saturday around the state, then a warming trend starts on Sunday, bringing temperatures that will rise above normal, reaching perhaps the 70s and 80s F by Monday. There will be a chance for showers and thunderstorms on late Sunday through early Tuesday, then cooler again for Wednesday and Thursday of next week.

Friday, April 20, 2018

Record Snowfall Totals for April

Record Snowfall Totals for April:

The heavy snowfalls and blizzard of April 13-16 set many records around the state. Many observers reported 12 to 18 inches of snowfall in total, while Milan, Lake Wilson, Tracy, Canby, and Madison reported over 19 inches. During the height of the snow, MSP Airport was closed and MN/DOT reported over 600 vehicle accidents.

Many new record daily snowfall amounts were reported for April 14th, among dozens were 7 inches at Amboy, 8 inches at Ortonville, 14 inches a Milan, and 23 inches at Canby (a new statewide record for the date). Then on April 15th even more new daily record snowfall amounts were reported, among them 12 inches at Winnebago and Rosemount, 12.7 inches at Duluth, 14 inches at Dawson and Montevideo, 16 inches at Minneota, and 25 inches at Tracy (a new statewide record for the date). So two new statewide daily snowfall records were set by this storm, 23 inches at Canby on the 14th and 25 inches at Tracy on the 15th, remarkable!

Overall during the snow storm 63 daily snowfall records were tied or set within the Minnesota climate network.

In addition many climate observers now report April of 2018 as their snowiest April in history, including the following:

MSP 26.1 inches (and 78.3” for the snow season, 10th highest all-time back to 1884)
Tracy 37 inches
Canby 36.9 inches
Montevideo 33 inches
Dawson 32 inches
Winnebago 31.5 inches
Milan 29.7 inches
Lakefield 32.1 inches
Bricelyn 33.3 inches
Marshall 27 inches

The Minnesota State Climatology Office posted a comprehensive summary of the storm.
Thankfully, it appears that much of the precipitation for the rest of the month will fall as rain, not snow.

Weekly Weather Potpourri:

The International Arctic Research Center reports this week via NOAA the most unusual winter conditions that have prevailed in the Bering Strait off the southwestern coast of Alaska. The lack of persistent sea ice there this winter caused a variety of problems for coastal communities.

There is a good article this week in the Yale Climate Connections about the city of Lancaster, CA transforming its power grid to mostly solar. That area of California has over 300 sunny days per year, so lots of potential for solar energy. The Republican Mayor, Rex Parris, has been a big proponent of solar energy, which has created over a thousand local jobs.

Warmer than normal weather will be a factor for the London Marathon on Saturday, April 21st. The daytime high temperature should be around the 70 degrees F mark, just short of the record for the London Marathon set in 2007 of 73 degrees F.

As a follow up to last year’s March for Science at the State Capitol in St Paul, there will be a Rally for Science at Mears Park in downtown St Paul on May 19th from noon to 2pm. There will be a variety of speakers, family activities, and information tables.

MPR listener question:

Paul and Susan Schurke at Wintergreen Dogsled Lodge near Ely noted that for them and Roland Fowler at Embarrass, overnight temperatures have been below freezing every night since October 27, 2017, a period of over 170 days. Is this a state record for consecutive nights with temperatures below freezing in Minnesota?

Answer:

Well, no, but it is getting close. The climate station at Brimson (St Louis County) reported 185 consecutive days from October 25, 2012 to April 27, 2013. Don’t know if there are 19th Century climate records that beat this, but Embarrass and Ely will have to string together several more days to beat Brimson.

Twin Cities Almanac for April 20th:


The average MSP high temperature for this date is 60 degrees F (plus or minus 11 degrees F standard deviation), while the average low is 39 degrees F (plus or minus 8 degrees F standard deviation).

MSP Local Records for April 20th:

MSP records for this date include: highest daily maximum temperature of 83 degrees F in 1980; lowest daily maximum temperature of 36 degree F in 1893; lowest daily minimum temperature of 21 degrees F in 2013; highest daily minimum temperature of 67 degrees F in 1985; record precipitation of 0.85 inches in 1893. Record snowfall on this date is 8.5 inches in 1893.

Average dew point for April 20th is 35°F; the maximum dew point on this date is 58°F in 1957; and the minimum dew point on this date is 6°F in 1988.

All-time state records for April 20th:

The all-time state high temperature for today's date is 96 degrees F at Georgetown (Clay County) in 1980; the all-time state low for today's date is -14 degrees F at Embarrass (St Louis County) in 2013. The all-time state record precipitation for this date is 3.08 inches at Collegeville (Stearns County) in 1893. Record snowfall is 18.0 inches at Ft Ripley (Crow Wing County) in 1893.

Past Weather Features:



One of the heaviest late season snowfalls in state history occurred over April 19-21, 1893. Snow was heavy with blizzard conditions in many areas. Among the state observer network, a foot of new snow was common, while Maple Plain reported over 20 inches, and St Cloud reported over 30 inches.


The warmest April 20th in state history was in 1980 when over 70 climate stations reported a daily high temperature of 80 degrees F or higher. Over a dozen western communities in Minnesota reported afternoon temperatures of 90s degrees F or greater. This heat was a precursor to drought in northwestern Minnesota that year.



The coldest April 20th in state history was in 2013, when an Arctic air mass brought subzero temperature readings to over a dozen communities in northern Minnesota. Even in southern areas of the state temperatures fell to the single digits and teens.

Outlook:

Plenty of sun under partly cloudy skies over the weekend, with warming temperatures. Sunday’s temperatures will be the first above normal readings since March 28th, and if the forecast high of 63 degrees F is reached for MSP it will be the first temperature that high since October 22 of last autumn. More cloudiness and slightly cooler Monday and Tuesday with a chance for rain by Tuesday. Warmer again towards the end of next week.

Friday, April 13, 2018

April Cold and Snow Revisited

April Cold and Snow Revisited:


The first 12 days of April have been historically cold in Minnesota with average temperatures ranging from 14 to 16 degrees F colder than normal. Some individual days have been 20 to 30 degrees F colder than normal. Within the state climate network over 120 new daily record cold low temperature values have been tied or set, while over 130 cold daily record maximum temperature values have been tied or set as well. Over 50 climate stations have reported subzero temperature readings on at least one morning this month. Crane Lake reported the coldest temperature in the nation on the 4th with a reading of -8°F, while Embarrass reported the nation’s coldest temperature on the 10th with a reading of 0°F.

For Twin Cities’ residents the first 12 days of April have been the coldest in history back to 1872. Here are the top five coldest first 12 days of April in the Twin Cities climate records:

2018 average temperature 27.5°F
1920 average temperature 28.2°F
1874 average temperature 29.2°F
1975 average temperature 29.4°F
1939 average temperature 32.1°F



We are spoiled as Twin Cities’ residents in that only 2 years in the past three decades have brought April monthly mean temperatures less than 42°F. Those years were 1996 and 2013.

In addition many areas of the state have reported 10 to 13 inches of snowfall so far this month (including MSP), with much more snow expected this weekend. Over the past three decades in the Twin Cities only the Aprils 2002 and 2013 have been snowy. On a statewide basis April of 2008 was one of the snowiest with over 20 climate stations reporting 30 inches of snow or more, and some northern communities reporting over 40 inches. So again across most of the recent decades we have had very few episodes of snowy Aprils. Perhaps our faulty human memories help us in this regard and we are more resilient as a result of forgetting the really challenging months of April.

Seems odd with such a cold, and snowy April underway that the NOAA-National Weather Service hosted Severe Weather Awareness Week this week, with tornado practice drills. But in an average spring season severe weather can begin to appear in April and May.

Weekly Weather Potpourri:

Ski-Scotland reports that it has been cold and snowy enough all winter that the snow pack in the highlands should allow for skiing well into the month of May. This is somewhat unusual but welcome news for avid skiers.

The Weather Underground staff provides a profile and analysis of the impact of Hurricane Maria on Puerto Rico in one of this week’s blogs. The NOAA National Hurricane Center did an exceptional job in forecasting Maria, but its’ devastation was remarkable, as it was one of the costliest hurricanes in history.

The Twins are playing the Cleveland Indians in Puerto Rico (April 17-18) next week in hopes of raising money and improving the spirits there as the citizens continue to recover from Hurricane Maria’s impacts. And speaking of Puerto Rico, the organization Casa Pueblo has never been without power since Hurricane Maria struck, thanks to the use of their solar power array. Now they are promoting the use of solar power to restore electricity to health care facilities and other needed services as Puerto Rico rebuilds its power grid.

In an AGU article this week European Union scientists explore the impacts of climate change on the European economy with respect to power generation, fresh water, tourism, and other sectors. It makes for an interesting read.

MPR listener question:

What is the latest date in the Spring season when school has been delayed or cancelled as a result of a snow storm?

Answer:

Sketchy records don’t allow an accurate answer to this question. I do recall that over May 2-3 (Thursday-Friday) of 2013 Dodge Center (Dodge County) received a record 17.2 inches of snowfall and local schools were either cancelled or delayed. I also suspect that on May 8, 1938 when Windom, MN reported over a foot of snow that school may have been delayed or cancelled back then as well.

Twin Cities Almanac for April 13th:

The average MSP high temperature for this date is 57 degrees F (plus or minus 11 degrees F standard deviation), while the average low is 36 degrees F (plus or minus 9 degrees F standard deviation).

MSP Local Records for April 13th:

MSP records for this date include: highest daily maximum temperature of 84 degrees F in 2006; lowest daily maximum temperature of 31 degree F in 1943; lowest daily minimum temperature of 2 degrees F in 1962; highest daily minimum temperature of 59 degrees F in 1941; record precipitation of 0.94 inches in 1991. Record snowfall on this date is 8.5 inches in 1928.

Average dew point for April13th is 31°F; the maximum dew point on this date is 64°F in 1941; and the minimum dew point on this date is -2°F in 1950.

All-time state records for April 13th:

The all-time state high temperature for today's date is 90 degrees F at Wheaton (Traverse County) in 2003; the all-time state low for today's date is -11 degrees F at Roseau (Roseau County) in 1950. The all-time state record precipitation for this date is 3.57 inches at Hutchinson (McLeod County) in 2010. Record snowfall is 13.0 inches at Kimbrae (Nobles County) in 1892.

Past Weather Features:

April 13-16, 1928 brought heavy snowfall to many parts of the state. Many areas reported 8 to 12 inches and over 14 inches in parts of Hennepin County.

The coldest April 13 in state history was in 1950 when over 20 climate stations reported subzero morning low temperatures, including -11 degrees F at Roseau where there was still 20 inches of snow on the ground.

April 13, 2003 was the warmest in state history with over 40 climate stations reporting a daytime high of 80 degrees F or greater. Both Campbell and Wheaton reported 90 degrees F.

Spring thunderstorms brought heavy rainfall to many parts of the state on April 13, 2010. Many areas of the state received between one and two inches of rain, while both Willmar and Hutchinson reported over 3 inches.

Outlook:

A powerful storm will affect many parts of Minnesota this weekend with rain, freezing rain, sleet, snow, and high winds. Some communities may see record-setting snowfall amounts. The storm will move out of the area by late Sunday, and the weather will be relatively quiet until another storm system arrives Wednesday and Thursday of next week. Temperatures overall will remain cooler than normal.




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